35 months old

Don’t freak out if you catch your child lying -- he’s not destined for a life of crime. A child’s first lie is actually a significant developmental milestone. To lie, a child needs good verbal skills, plus enough imagination to be able to invent an alternate reality. He probably understands that telling the truth would disappoint someone -- which shows that he understands expectations and emotions. So instead of punishing your child for lying, try gently confronting him with the truth. (“I see cookie crumbs on your face,” for instance.) Talk briefly about the importance of telling the truth, but don’t lecture him.

your toddler at 35 months
  • He may now have the coordination required to pedal a tricycle, but he might not be interested in riding, might still scoot along with his feet down.
  • You may be able to (finally!) convince him to play on his own a little bit.
  • He might be playing favorites -- acting as if he likes you better than daddy or vice versa. Don’t worry -- the roles will reverse at some point.


  • toddler know-how at 35 months

    Handle weird phases (like barking like a dog!) like they’re no big deal, so long as they don’t interfere with normal activities. Just explain that it’s a thing he can do at some times but can’t at others. And get it on video.


    The Bump experts: David W. Jones, MD, pediatrician at Kaiser Permanente Panola Medical Center and Stonecrest Medical Center; and Riley Minster, MD, pediatrician at Lakeshore Pediatrics and instructor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern


    Reminder: Medical info on The Bump is FYI only and doesn't replace a visit to a medical professional.