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Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I'm trying to make childcare plans for my baby once my maternity leave is over. How do I decide whether daycare or a nanny is right for me?

Re: I'm trying to make childcare plans for my baby once my maternity leave is over. How do I decide whether daycare or a nanny is right for me?

The Bump Expert

Both strategies have their pros and cons. Daycare is less expensive than hiring a full-time nanny, and baby will be surrounded by other children in a stimulating environment. However, no daycare center will be able to provide the level of personal attention that a nanny can.  Also, if you and your spouse leave for work early or stay late often,  it might be difficult to find a center to accommodate your hours. A nanny is more likely to be flexible -- provided you pay her for the extra time. Finding the “perfect” nanny is tricky, though. (Um, there isn’t one... but you can come pretty close.) The only way to decide what’s right for you is to visit a number of daycare centers and interview a number of nannies. Once you’ve narrowed it down to a few options that work with your schedule and budget, go with your gut for the final decision.

Paula Kashtan

re: Q: Nanny vs. Daycare

I work at a daycare and personally I would say it depends on you and your personality. Are you the type of person that things have to be done at certain times like you have a real strict schedule or are you going to be a little lax (for lack of a better word) on some stuff? I work in the toddler room and some parents come in with all these demands and I have to tell them "I can't do that I have 9 other children besides yours and I can't always give special attention to one" Also I work at an extremely expensive daycare (in my opinion) and I think if you're going to pay that much you probably have a day nanny maybe not a live in one but a day one and they will be able to give your baby one on one care. Either way you're going to be paying a lot because at daycares like with nannies you have to buy/provide diapers, wipes, extra clothes, medicine, etc etc. Plus also think about it; with a nanny if it works out your baby will have the same caregiver until they go to school whereas with daycare by their first year, they'll start transitioning to new teachers every six months or so.

LadyNieto |

re: Q: Nanny vs. Daycare

One other important issue: daycares are inspected and licenced by the state; there is no certification or licensure for nannies in this country. Also with a daycare you have other sets of eyes (i.e. those of the other parents); with a nanny, it's just whatever you see going on unless you use a nannycam!There certainly are advantages to having a nanny--more flexibility with hours, you get to choose your schedule, your toys, your crib, your rules...

iluvmadbiker |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I'm looking for a list of best questions to ask potential daycares for our infant. I only found questions for a in-home nanny.

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Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I've nannied for 6 1/2 years, before I had my own LO. One of my best girlfriends worked in a daycare for 1 year in the infant room. She quit because of the poor level of care the babies are given. In a high end daycare you have 6 babies to 1 adult. Think about it how would YOU feed and change 6 babies?????? Their isn't time for holding and playing. Cuddles and faces yea right! For the price you pay for infant daycare you could easily get a nanny. To care for and love your infant like their own. Your baby in a daycare could have 10 different caregivers in a week. Or 1 Nanny that knows them and keeps there schedule. Plays with them, hugs, and teaches the skills they need. I believe that kids need security of the same caregiver. You can go through a nanny sites that screen, background check, to find the perfect nanny. You have no say over who watches your baby at a daycare!

adhdfashion |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I'm a SAHM but my good friend has both her LOs in a small, in-home daycare. I've gone with her to pick them up and it really seems like the best compromise between a large institution care situation and a nanny. The caregiver is a grandma-type and is helped out by her daughter, so the teachers don't change.

titania9 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I'm currently trying to decide between an in-home caregiver (6 kids to 1 caregiver) and a full center-based day care and found a couple of the answers above inaccurate, at least in my experience. I have not yet found a nanny that charges anything less than $450-500 per WEEK. So to say the least, the options in the original question are not just interchangeable: the financial implications of this decision are huge. We're well under the nanny price range so are looking at day cares and in-home day cares only at a range of $200-$275 per week. I'd like to know if anyone has any input about the benefits of both. I think the continuity and bonding of the in-home caregiver is significant, but the additional available eyes within a center-based day care are important too. In Texas the government keeps up a web site with the licensed/regulated in-home caregiver and we'll ONLY go with one who is in full compliance with the state just like the center would have to be. But past that I want to weigh all the pros and cons before we decide. I just can't seem to figure out what's best for my baby!

emharm |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I am the director of a developmental center for children. I have worked at this center for 8 years and it is always difficult for parents to place their baby, toddler, or preschooler in the care of others. In response to the question "What questions can I ask a provider for infant care?" I would recommend the following for all age groups: 1. What are your state licensing standards? (This would tell how the program standards are meansured.) 2. What is your teacher turnover, and how long have the present ones been here? 3. What are your ratios? 4. What are the education requirements are teachers? 5. What curriculum do you use? (Then you should research it!) Also, word of mouth is the most powerful form of advertisment for childcare! When you meet with the director, note how you are greeted, the health and sanitation score, does the place smell and look clean, what are the children doing, etc. I hope this helps! Good luck!

tlbryant93 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Having a live-in au pair can be quite affordable in comparison to a nanny or daycare. For approximately $350 a week per family, you can can up to 45 hours of childcare and a schedule you set. No more getting your child and yourself out of the house in the morning or having to take the day off from work if your child is sick and daycare wants him/her to stay home. With the schedule you set you can even have some time for yourself or date night with your significant other. I hope this helps. If you would like more information in hosting an au pair please contact me.

krelstab |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

We currently have a nanny for our 21 month old son. There are pros and cons. But for us it is ideal. Day care centers are licensed, but are not inspected on a frequent basis. And our son would not get the attention that he gets now. He also has not picked up bad habits like pinching, hitting and biting and he is not as rough like some of his playmates that attend day care. He also has not be sick as often. I do wish he had more socialization, but storytime, weekend activities and visits to the park are good. Nannies are more affordable than you think. Try them out for a week or two and see how it goes and ask practical questions when interviewing. Ask questions that are scenarios of how they would handle situations. Including emergencies and scenarios that would require them to use their common sense (it's not all that common some times). And always make sure anyone including parents and grandparents have infant CPR.

ablackman |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Also check out your state laws. 6 infants to 1 adult seems crazy! That is illegal in Florida - the legal ration is 4 infants to 1 adult. Granted 1:1 is always preferable. But when we looked at nannies, the cost was so much more significant that it's simply not an option for us. I wish it was because of the flexibility. But we know we must do day care, so now we are just trying to pick the best one. It's so freaking hard to know which one is "right" for you!

sharethevision |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

In Maryland the ratio is 1 teacher per 6 children. I've visited some day care centers in the Baltimore-Washington area and they charge anywhere from $250 to $370 a week. Nannies cost about $13-15 per hour, and at home daycare are substantially cheaper, but unless I have a very strong recommendation, I think I will chose the large daycare facilities -- at least there are several people watching. The idea of leaving my LO in the care of a stranger terrifies me.

DaniDuran |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Actually in Maryland, the legal ratio is 1:3, which is the most restrictive in the nation (only 2 other states (Kansas and Mass) have that low of a ratio). It goes to 1:6 at the 2-year stage. Most daycare centers have a maximum of 6 infants per room, but there needs to be 2 teachers in the room at all times. I am currently visiting daycare centers in the Mount Airy/Ellicott City area of Maryland and this is the norm. I am also looking into in-home daycare and they usually have a maximum of 2 infants in addition to older children. In-home daycare usually allows a maximum of 5-7 kids, unless there is an assistant. The choice really depends on the family. Good luck to everyone; it is not an easy decision. I hate the thought of leaving my LO, but financially there is not much choice for us!

jamfarrar |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Ratios are different in every state. In Pa infants are 1:4 and although it may seem like they don't get special attention, each child gets their time. Nothing compares to the individual type of care you get from a nanny, but I am a nanny now and worked at a daycare for 4 years. I loved each of my babies and made sure each one was cared for. You will be able to tell if you mesh well when you meet them. You have to be realistic with what you expect from both, daycares are a lot like an assembly line, but at any good daycare there is time for individual attention. A nanny needs clear guidelines, do you expect dishes to be done, laundry, cleaning? Its a lot to deal with. If the nanny gets sick and can not come in, what will you do? If the teacher at the daycare gets sick at least there is another person to take over.I prefer in home daycares.. its the best of both worlds. You get the child interaction with other kids, decent prices, low numbers, and state guidelines that have to be followed. Good luck with your search.

CJSST57 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Daycare introduces your little ones to a sense of community and begins teaching them social skills that they will need to be active with other children in school and with people in life. However, I chose to wait until my son was 3 years old before putting him into the care of a daycare center. You should defintely tour daycare facilities/homes to find the right match for your family. Adn if you just dont feel that its the right time or place..then dont do it, even if its something within your budget. I dont really think that daycare centers in public gyms are good because their employees are staff who may not be qualified in Early Childhood Education and or Human Development, therefore the people there may not really know the needs of your infant, toddler or even your growing child. I defintely think that finding a private Nanny or being in close enough contact with a family member is the best idea. Just be careful on who you pick, because you want to know when and where your baby is going if they plan on taking them out of your home. You will want soemone who ahs been with a family for more than a few months and someone who is willing to be on-call. It is hard to find a good nanny and out of personal experience, with your first child, I don't recommend trying to go back to work full time until the baby is at least a year old. Afterall, you don't want to miss out on some of the most special times between you and your baby's bonding time* Take advantage of your maternity leave, if you can get more time off...take it. Your baby needs you more than anyone else during the first year. Good Luck ^_^

rhianda1 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I can't believe The Bump has this in the third trimester! I live in a major city and day care wait lists are 12-18 months long for infant care. If I had waited until now we wouldn't be in until LO is nearly two!

kalikah |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I would have to say daycare. I know the ratio of kids to adults are a lil extreme but if u pick the right one everything is great. I choose one with cameras I monitor my son thru my phone thru out the day in every room he goes into.

Morales0724 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

neither... at home mommy is best. Happy child.

jack321 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

i am a full time nanny for 5 kids and 27weeks preg and i also have taught preschool before. As a nanny i have one on one contact with all the kids and they get the attention they need for development. I feel like some preschools are so CRAZY and you never get to know the teachers and you dont know what your kids are getting exposed to. i would always go with the nanny route or stay at home mom.

ctellson |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I worked my connections! I put messages out on Facebook and via e-mail and we were EXTREMELY lucky. We were looking at some in-home daycares, which were fine. However, we ended up finding a 19-year old girl to come to our home and watch our baby. She is a friend of a friend, so that made me feel better right from the start. She was working in a daycare center (watching six 1-year olds!), so she's been background checked and knows CPR and first aid. For 9 1/2 hours a day, we pay $30 a day!!!!! Absolutely amazing. We told her from the beginning what we could afford and we knew it was not much considering what she could probably get elsewhere. She didn't care. She was looking to get out of the daycare because she wanted to work with ONE child and watch them as they grow. She is amazing and we are SO blessed to have found her. We do try to compensate her with gifts and/or extra money when we have it because we want her to stick around. My grandmother watches the baby on Wednesdays. On the first Wednesday, the nanny sent me a text message saying she missed the baby and was really sad when she woke up and realized she wasn't going to see him that day. When I think about it, I'm so glad we went with her because I know he is receiving one-on-one attention - the closest thing to having me there without me actually being there. But, like, I said we were LUCKY! I don't know if you could find anyone else like our nanny! If we hadn't found her, we would have went with an in-home daycare. Our nanny says after working in a daycare center, she would NEVER send her child to one, but I also know how hard it is to find someone you trust to leave your child with!

lissatz |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

$30 a day?!?! That's outrageous! You need to be paying atleast minium wage which would be closer to $70 day.... If she is so wonderful she won't be sticking around for long with that low of pay.

sarahschieldevents |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I'm going with in-home day care. Thats pretty much the only option where I live. I will pay $85 a week. I have the advantage though that this is my sister in law and she will be having a baby a couple weeks before mine is due! I like the idea of in-home day cares anyway because there are generally less children to adults and in-home day cares have the same caregiver year after year as long as that person continutes to do day care, where as some people discussed day care centers where there is a new care person every few years as the child gets older.

SarahMarie13 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I am a Mama, Nanny, and former day care teacher. I would choose a nanny. Kids in childcare don't get the one on one love and attention. I became a nanny after seeing the problems and safety issues, in even the best of centers. I knew there was a better way to care for children. I am now expecting our third child and working part time as a Nanny. I am blessed to be able to bring both of my little ones with me. Since all the kids are close in ages, they get all the stimulation they need from our "play dates" and planned outings. If you have a Nanny agency in your local area I suggest using them. The Nanny's will be screened VERY closely, and come with a thick resume, references etc (all checked out before hand), so you'll know what you are getting when the women shows up for her interviews.

Saige KIR |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I wnt near neither. My mom & I have everything situated. Please you cant trsut anybody w-ya child. Especially a new born.

TruN |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I really wanted a nanny at my home. However, we've only been living in our area for a few years and don't know that many people. Without a network of friends to tap I didn't trust just getting anyone. There is a daycare that it right across the street from my office. As it turned out our pediatrician has her kids there as well as some of my co-workers that had great things to say about the daycare. It worked out well because I was BF exclusively and was able to go over for every feeding. (No pumping..yay!) It was also a great way to get to know the daycare ladies by being there so often. They are wonderful and I even had one care for my daughter while I was in the hospital giving birth to my son. Overall, I'd still doubt anyone watching my kids and would have trust issues. I never would have imagined that I'd have them at a daycare. My sister had to fire her incompetent nanny after less than a month and then had trouble finding someone else. She resorted to a reputable daycare and now loves it. You just have to go with what feels right for you.

chgolil |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

another option is family-based care, where the nanny takes care of your child in their home with other children. We asked around to get good referrals for day cares and nannies and came across the lady we're going to go with. If you're going to go with a nanny, I would suggest going with someone who has been in the business a long time and has good references.

cherylnye122807 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Personally, my daughter benefited from being at a daycare. She learned to be social and her MOMMY attachment stage at 8 months went on only for about 2 weeks. she likes going there because she gets a lot of room and kids to play with. They also tough her how to hold the bottle when she was really little and how to eat and drink from a sippy cup. I chose this daycare because it is close, everything is systematized but it is a family owned business so all the teachers are very friendly and supportive of all the kids.

dorinatchalov |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

My husband and I decided to go with a daycare because of affordability and we had to sign up when I was 10 weeks! Apparently, waiting lists can be long. We toured different locations and asked questions about state licensing, teacher to child ratio, discipline procedures as the baby gets older, curriculum, diversity of classrooms-teachers and students, if they allowed cloth diapers, breast milk, open door for parents, how long the teachers and directors have been there, and safety. This particular daycare has a room that I can go and breast feed anytime of day. They also had various areas for baby to hang out--sleep in a swing, rocking chair for teachers to rock, and they are assigned a crib. In my state, it is 4 infants per teacher. We also have a non-profit that rates daycare centers called the Family Conservancy and I called to check out this place. Additionally, it came recommended to me from a friend. I did search on Care.com for in home child care so that might be a site worth looking into. I have lots of friends with a variety of situations and it will really depend on you. I have friends that are or have SAHM, family that will care for the LO, daycare-big and in home, and people that have hired nannies. Best of luck in your search!

brooklynoe |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I am currently on maternity leave. The minute I found out I was pregnant I began pondering the same question. My 11 yr old went to our church daycare, but it is now close. My sister's best friend has recently opened an in-home daycare. I feel extremely comfortable leaving my son in her care 1. I've known her for over 20 yrs. 2.She has been a certified daycare director & knows state regulations. 3. She ran the daycare my 11 yr old attended. It is hard to find someone trustworthy to care for your child(ren). I am blessed to know someone that I trust to keep my son.

cidybro |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Everything obviously depends on what you can afford, but I am a nanny to a little 2 year old girl. Her parents chose to put her in daycare 2 days a week (for socialization), and then I watch her 3 days. I still work 40 hours, as 2 of the 3 nights I work until 9pm, so the mom and dad can have date nights. The little girl gets plenty of one on one attention with me (she just turned 2 today and knows her colors, shapes, and some letters), but is also well socialized. However, her socialization is not limited to the daycare. She lives in the city, so we venture out for different activities everyday and she socializes with other children then too, including some we see pretty regularly. Another benefit of a nanny (which you would have to specify upon hiring) is that I also do quite a bit of cleaning and laundry, so the parents come home to a clean house. Prior to becoming a nanny, I was a daycare director. I can see the benefits of that as well. It really depends on the demands of the parent. Daycares have to follow state regulations (for the most part is good)- however, they can't always accommodate the individual needs of a child. For example, say the child is getting over a cold and sleeps better on an angle (like in a swing) and won't sleep when layed flat. The child wouldn't be able to sleep well at the daycare, because (at least in IL) they can only leave them in the swing for 15 minutes. Also, keep in mind, with a nanny, you would have to figure out taxes as an employer. A good website to try out is care.com. They have potential nannies and/or 1 day a week babysitters with background checks. You can put in how much you are willing to pay and they will match you up with someone that may work for you.

linz1687 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

There are a lot of things to consider when making this decision. First of all, not all daycares/preschools are set up the same. Each state has their own requirements, ratios and regulations, and within each state, different schools do things differently, so be sure to look around and many facilities and keep track of things like ratios, teacher turn over, when they transition kids and move them up to new classes and things like that. Someone posted that it is 6 babies to 1 adult, but that is not the case in many states or schools. In FL for example the state rules set the maximum ratio for infants is 4 to 1 adult. Some schools will go beyond that state requirements as well, just expect those centers to be at the higher end of the pricing. Also, some school participate in the federal food program. If they do, that will save you money with formula and baby food, but find out what they provide and see if it works for you and your baby. I have worked in childcare for over 8 years now, both as a nanny and as a preschool teacher. I am currently working in administration in a preschool, where my 12 month old son also attends. I see everything first hand that goes on at this school and could not be happier with the level of care and attention the teachers give him. He also has a blast everyday with the toys, projects and activities the teachers plan and also with the other children.

havayoohoo |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Ive been both a nanny and worked in a high end daycare . I am 19 wks along and thinking Im going to the nanny route. Infant/baby room had about 12 babies in a spilt room with i think about 4 adults (back when I worked there) . That is ok but once they get older forget it.... they are too many little ones in one room ,which I found they didnt really show on tours. As a nanny I took the baby on walks,taught her things and plus they can still go baby groups outside of house for company. I like the idea of having my baby in their own home . Prices for nice baby daycare is just as expensive if not more as nanny.

bucsfans1225 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

My hubby and I are trying to figure out the same thing. We only have one daycare near our home. We would only need the care for 4days 1/2day each day. Since I don't drive hubby would drop the baby off in the afternoon and pick I'd pick her up at night on my way home, it's literally down the street. How ever for the same price and amt of time we can get a nanny to come to the apt. So we are up in the air on what to do. I'm leaning toward the nanny. If anyone is interested, we found out about the nanny in our area from a website called www.care.com. We saw the commercial on tv.

prncebride |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

My husband and I are currently looking at nannies versus daycares. The cost in Texas is EXTREMELY different. We would be looking at paying a full-time nanny (40-45 hours/wk) around $480-$570/wk. A full-time daycare would be in the neighborhood of $200-$250/wk. We've also looked at the pros-cons: 1) we feel a daycare would offer more flexible hours without adding to the cost. They are open 6:30a-6:30p whereas if we asked a nanny to stay late we would have to pay overtime 2) while the daycares we've toured seem clean and safe there are several kids sitting by themselves or crying alone even though they have a 4:1 or 8-10:2 ratios for infants. 3) we worry our LO would get sick more often if they attend a daycare vs. a nanny 4) if we went with a nanny there is so much to do, get an employee identification number, calculate and pay taxes and TX unemployment, work out vacation/sick time, travel expenses (i.e., tolls, gas, etc.), raises/bonuses, and on and on, but on the flip side you get the continuity of one childcare provider and one-on-one attention. While I hate to say it, a lot of it comes down to budget and the type of lifestyle we'd like to maintain. I struggle to justify a nanny if we can't afford to fund college savings or send them to summer camps or provide the "nice-to-haves". However, a little sacrifice might be a healthier, more advanced child if they receive the one-on-one attention a nanny can provide. Needless to say, we're on the fence and still deciding. Only 5.5 months along so we still have a while to research some more, but if anyone has any suggesstions on how they made it work financially I would really appreciate it.

LoveStoryOf2010 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I think the daycare would be a better choice than hiring a nanny.Anyway If you choose to hire a nanny I would recommend you to do an employee criminal background check on her just to be sure that she doesn't have criminal record.

deanjohnson |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I live near Vancouver, Canada and the daily cost of daycare for one child (average) is $35. For one child, daycare is the cheaper alternative. When we have our second child we plan on having a live-in nanny as it is substantially cheaper.

Mr&MrsPacMan |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I'm a firm believer in personalized one-on- one care for infants. I believe they need face time and alot of attention in thier first year of life that is why my first child stayed at home with a relative while I worked until she potty-trained which was about 2 years. Once she was out ofdiapers, I saw daycare as a good social opportunity for her. She was able to learn to interact with other children and stick to the center's schedule; the center also taught the children their alphabet, numbers, colors etc. She learned how to be responsible for her personal belongings while she was there as well. I am doing the same thing with my second child; she is currently one year old right now but once she potty trains, I will send her to daycare.

MaricellaOlguin |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I am going to have a nanny for 8 weeks so i can work 3 days a week to help pay for one and then at 12 weeks we are putting our little bug in daycare so I can go back to work fulltime! :)

LaurenandMike13 |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I am lucky enough to be able to care for two of the most beautiful babies in the world.It happened quite by accident.I love babies, so when my neighbor came home with hers, my hubby and I ran outside just to get a peek but not to intrude. I was shocked when my neighbor placed that little angel in my arms thinking ,of course ,she just wanted to get in the house and settle in. I was totally enthralled. I loved that baby instantly.At that time she had another care giver.But she gratiously let me watch the baby when she went on small errands,I was Thrilled! Long story short, things didn't work out with her sitter so I am now the proud nanny. Soon after came another bundle of pure love and joy. So now I care for a 8 month old and a 19 month old. Never having kids myself I never thought I could do it. But the mom trusted me and my hubby enough to give us a try. We love those babies like our own grandchildren.We never thought we would be so blessed.He loves them so much too. As far as money......it is more a labor of love. From what I am reading on this board, child care is outrageous!!!!! Although it is a lot of work. The best reward is that tight tight hug before they go home or that random kiss on the cheek I get out of nowhere.

Brujabrew |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Oh...lol thats the difference between nanny and daycare! One question,,,how do I get rid of ths avatar. I keep changing it to a nursery but there is no save button. lol

Brujabrew |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Lovestory, is that price for one child? wow!

Brujabrew |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

We went with a third option: in-home daycare. The caregiver works from her own home and takes care of her own children (if she has any) and a few other kids. Ours has no children, but she does take care of another infant and a few toddlers part-time. She is affordable and flexible, and willing to comply with my wishes. I am the only one of her mothers that breastfeeds (I pump at work), but she has no problem keeping me up-to-date on my daughter's feedings. My baby gets plenty of love and attention there, as well.

ttaniah |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

I worked in a daycare for 4 years and I have been working as a Nanny for 2 years and I can tell you its all on your own personal opinion. Now that I am pregnant I don't think I would put my baby in day care until she was a little older. The center I worked in had army credentials, security and everything you would want for a safe environment for your little one but I just prefer the one on one aspect for an infant. My personal opinion is to put the baby in daycare when they are older for socializing and use a nanny for early moments.

nickandkassi |

Q&A: Differences between a nanny and daycare?

Reading this Q&A, I'm more confused than ever. I'm 4 months along and after maternity leave will need to go back to work full time. I'm in a unique situation where I'm the higher income spouse, so my income is crucial and my husband doesn't want to be Mr. Mom. I'd love to give my baby 2 years (as some on here recommend) and then go back to work, but its simply not an option. My mother-in-law can help some, but not every day and my parents unfortunately do not live nearby. So it's going to need to be Nanny or Daycare. I'm leaning towards Nanny, as I do work from home and can be around to keep an eye somewhat and am worried about putting a 4 month old in daycare - that just seems too young. But I am worried about the expense - I haven't looked into the cost yet, am starting to now but some of the numbers people have quoted sound crazy. What do people think about a Nanny until 3 and then daycare until the child is in school? My sister had a nanny for all three of her kids and she was great - but she was a rare find - a grandmother who would do cooking and cleaning. I don't know that I'll get that lucky.

atraveller |