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Q&A: What's a doula?

My neighbor had a doula who was there when she gave birth and for a few weeks after. What exactly is a doula and why would I need one?

Re: My neighbor had a doula who was there when she gave birth and for a few weeks after. What exactly is a doula and why would I need one?

The Bump Expert Doulas (also called childbirth assistants) are specially trained to provide support during labor and delivery. A doula also serves as a go-between for the doctor, nurses, and you and your mate. Think of her as a knowledgeable companion who can offer encouragement and wisdom throughout the birth process. Experienced doulas know all about positioning, soothing touch and other comfort measures to ease the general experience.
Many doulas also offer at-home help after baby is born, usually for a couple of weeks. Her role is to mother the mother (you), and may change from day to day. She'll generally do whatever is necessary to help you adjust, including making sure you’re well-fed and hydrated. She will also provide education for you about baby care and breastfeeding. To find a doula, ask your doc for a recommendation, check out local mom reviews on lila guide, or try the Doula Organization of North America's finder.

Paula Kashtan

re: Q: Doula basics?

I have a really good friend who is a birth doula. If you're in the Portland, Oregon area you may contact her through www.newcreationdoulas.comShe's wonderful!!! Her name is Kim.

dsrossing |

re: Q: Doula basics?

Doula is misspelled on the main page.

Mrs.Incognito |

re: Q: Doula basics?

Check out the link above (www.dona.org) Dona International is an organized non-profit group who trains doula's. They even list Doula's by state so you can find some in your area. I had a doula for both of my births and I am so glad I did. They were very helpful.

bryans4 |

re: Q: Doula basics?

About how much can I expect tht a doula would cost?

asloan1982 |

re: Q: Doula basics?

So basically, a doula is like the guy in 'Father of the Bride II"?

MEGrover |

Q&A: What's a doula?

A doula sounds fabulous, but I'm also wondering how much a 24 hour tutor/slave runs for these days :)

Sandy281 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I had a doula my last birth and I'm planning to have the same doula with me for this birth...she was and is awesome! I wish insurance covered her though....

CasondraMJ |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I live in Phoenix and here doulas range from free (for a student needing experience) up to $1000 for the very high end ones. I have read that on the East Coast, they can easily cost $2000! Beginning doulas charge about $300-400 while more experienced one charge $600 and up. This is only for the birth doulas (who do about 2 prenatal visits to go over your birth plan, are there throughout labor plus a few hours afterwards, then check on you a few times during the first week). Postpartum doulas who come and help you after the birth, generally charge by the hour. They help with childcare, housework, perhaps cook a meal or two, whatever you need. The only doula I talked to who offered this service charged $20/hour, which seems high. I'd rather just pay a local teen babysitter to come over and do some odd jobs while I rest. Labor doulas are great from what I hear. My midwife practically insists first time moms hire one since the first birth is the hardest. I'm still looking if anyone knows of a low cost doula in AZ:)

'mingo |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I thought doulas were typically used in natural births. Is it common to have a doula support a birth in a hospital? Does anyone have an experience to share?

SDMama |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I am also thinking of hiring a doula. Labor has been such a scary thing to me, if a doula helps me be more at ease any amount of money is worth that. I'd love to hear stories of people using one and what the pros and cons were (if any cons)?

chestnuthillestate |

Q&A: What's a doula?

SDMama- People use them in the hospitals, too. They serve a few different purposes there. 1) They act as your advocate to doctors and nurses so that when its in the thick of things, they can be clear-headed and helping to say, "No, she would prefer only an epidural but nothing else, unless medically necessary" etc. 2) They're trained in relaxation techniques and can assist you with that. 3) They can help with breast-feeding and lead you through everything to do. 4) Some women who end up receiving lots of pain medications and things have trouble remembering the birth, but yet really want a clear view of what happened in the delivery room. The doula can help piece that information back together for you. Hope this helps. I'm hiring one and I'm going to be in the hospital's "alternative birthing center", but I'm also going to try for a natural birth.

smwilliams4 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

A person who helps you with the baby?

joli1love |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I live in central Florida and used a doula with my first son and we are meeting with her tomorrow to discuss my next delivery in August. She charged $500 for the entire process which included meetings during the pregnancy, coming to my home at the beginning of labor and staying with me in the hospital until the baby was born. She also offered to stop by our home to help with breastfeeding once we were home. She made me so comfortable that by the time I went to the hospital my son was born 13 minutes later with only 2 pushes. Even she was caught off guard by how far along I was in the delivery process. You can get more information about my doula at www.apositivebeginning.com She was wonderful and I could not imagine going through this process again without her. The only negative aspect about using a doula was the reaction from the nurses in the hospital. When I mentioned that I would have a doula when I was on the hospital tour one of the nurses literally rolled her eyes at me and I left in tears. I think some of the hospital staff want you to lay down, shut up, and do what they tell you which is exactly why I loved having someone on my side who knew what was going on.

FlaJen |

Q&A: What's a doula?

For anyone in the DC Metro area, Johns Hopkins has a free doula program to help nursing students get experience. I am going to meet with a couple to decide whether or not I want to go with one, but the idea has already made my husband more comfortable, as this is our first baby and he was feeling the pressure of being my muscle in the delivery room. LOL. I'll post my impressions.

switchfacexa1ex |

Q&A: What's a doula?

My mom is my doula!! I am so lucky to have her. I highly recommend having family present during this time if at all possible.

lebennett |

Q&A: What's a doula?

Ok, so as much as I love the idea of a doula, isn't this what your husband is for? I mean seriously. He helped make it, he's taking classes with me, and he's done a great job taking care of me so far, as if I couldn't do it myself....long story short, I see it this way. the kind of dough you have to shell out for this person to help you out a couple of days a week, I would rather spend on a better nursery and diapers. Don't mean to sound cynical, this is just my opinion.

GaGaBean |

Q&A: What's a doula?

My mom is going to be the 'doula', but this got me thinking is there any guidance out there on how someone (like my mom) can be the most help to me during and after the birth?

jlprellop |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I agree with my fellow mommy-to-be's - Husband/Partners, and/or your mom or in-law (if you are fortunate to still have yours) can provide the BEST advice. They have watched you from day one, and are most likely well aware of your wants and desires for birth, and afterwards. However, if one has over $2k to shell out for the Doula, that's fine, but consider that money for more tangible items for baby, or yourself. Also, believe it or not, college will be right around the corner!!! To each her own, and I wish everyone a safe and easy birth no matter who is by your side =0)

kellyfox31 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I've hired a doula for my second birth, and I wish I had done so for my first birth. I am on a limited budget, especially with a hospital birth to plan to pay for, but I found a doula who needed some experience and references who was able to work with my budget. Hiring a doula can save you money in the end because studies have proven that doulas reduce your likelihood of needing additional interventions like epidurals, Pitocin, and C-sections. I had an epidural for less than two hours with my first daughter and it was an additional $800 after insurance for it! My doula is not even charging a quarter of that that and hopefully I can avoid the intervention that I never wanted. My husband was so upset at the pain I was in for the first birth that he was no help whatsoever with anything we had planned for. I strongly recommend any first-time mom and others to look at doulas. Signing up for a labor class like Lamaze, Bradley Method, or some other childbirth education class (hospital classes proved to be less than helpful in my case) would be a great way to learn how to handle the pain of birthing. If you don't want a doula, it'd be great to have a dedicated support person (husband, mother, best friend) to go with you. My husband and I went to the hospital classes and they only gave us a very one-sided view of things. He was also not the right person to help me through labor. He was too deeply involved and nervous himself to be able to calm me and help me focus.

Mommy2Ciara2007 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I personally don't agree with having a doula, your partner or another family member should be your support. If you do decide to have one, just make sure they don't get in the way of the doctor or hospital staff doing their job. You went to the hospital for a reason, they have been delivering babies for longer than your doula has been alive! If you need extra support, fine. Just remember that the hospital staff has been doing this for a lot longer! It's not worth risking your life or your baby's if the doula gets in the way of medical care.

tripletfeb |

Q&A: What's a doula?

Doulas can remain calm where a husband or other family member may not. The hospital view of childbirth is NOT to always do what is best for mother and baby, but to make birth as fast as possible so that they can get you out of there and get new patients in. Sometimes it's just so the doctor can get home in time for dinner. This is why hospitals don't like people like doulas who really will advocate for you and not be manipulated by a nurse telling you that you really do need to induce your birth for the sake of your baby, which most times you don't. Hospitals are businesses. They like to induce births because that necessitates epidurals, which necessitates more pitocin, which too often necessitates unnecessary C sections. The hospitals get to charge your insurance for all of this unnecessary intervention and they know it. A doula can help you avoid this cycle because of their education and being less emotionally involved the way your husband might be. I think a doula is more important in a hospital than any other birth scenario, where you are more vulnerable to unnecessary intervention.

sarahhutto |

Q&A: What's a doula?

@sarahhutto great answer! Another note, it has been found in studies that even if your Doula was to sit in the corner of your hospital room as you delivered it would lower your risk/chance of intervention by 10% because it visually reminds the people at the hospital what kind of birth you are determined to have. (Unless of course a true problem or emergency arises.) @tripletfeb Doulas understand childbirth and are not there to get in the way of the hospital or prevent needed medical intervention but to help you make sure you don't get unneeded intervention. Also to state that hospitals have been delivering babies for longer then a doula is inaccurate. - Hospitals don't deliver babies, doctors, nurses, or midwives do and it is quite possible to have a Doula who has attended as many or more births than your delivery assistant.

Little Heater |

Q&A: What's a doula?

Also, she wrote down an account of the entire birth which was really nice to have afterward.

mommytotwogirls |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I will be hiring a doula for my hospital birth, for many reasons. I want to have a natural birth, and although I am planning to attend classes with my husband, I know he'll be too excited and nervous to remember everything they tell him. Also it will be helpful to have someone who knows about comfort techniques, and can show my husband how to be the most helpful to me. I specifically chose the hospital I'm delivering at because they encourage natural childbirth and welcome doulas. So just because you will be delivering in a hospital, doesn't mean it has to be a hostile environment. I understand this is not the norm, but hopefully it will become normal.

AmieLittles7 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I LOVE my doula, she is an amazing woman who has attended over 600 births and has been involved in childbirth advocacy since the 70's. I know that she will make my experience in labor more bearable and manageable by suggesting positions to labor in, massaging me and encouraging me when I need it. My husband will be helping her with all of this as well, but since this is his first baby he doesn't know anything about giving birth but the Doula does. She will not get in the way if their is an emergency and I need medical intervention, but she will be able to make sure I have all of the facts before I make a decision about that medical intervention. She is worth every penny I am going to spend because she already makes me comfortable and puts me at ease about my impending labor. People don't think twice about spending 1000 dollars on another flat screen tv or vacation so why would you have to think about spending that for one of the most important experiences of your life.

cdelbove |

Q&A: What's a doula?

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watson012 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

@ switchfacexa1ex or anyone else in DC Metro/Baltimore area: What did you find out with the John Hopkins program? I've had a very long run of bad luck w/ pregnancies and this is a first for my SO but I also have the support of my BFF who is a nurse and has 2 kids--- not sure if I want to involve someone else or not..... BFF is knowledgable and confident enough to speak up for me if need be.....but another friend back in PA was a doula and she said it may be a really good idea to find one anyway..... Please feel free to EMAIL me response @ meque183@yahoo.com

meque183 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

http://brendalane.suite101.com/doulas-more-effective-than-staff-or-mothers-family-friends-a351488 This is a great article that shows how doulas really do help in labor and delivery!

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Q&A: What's a doula?

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watson012 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

If you are giving birth in a stand alone birthing center with midwives do you really need a doula? The thought of another semi-stranger in the room does not sound appealing to me. I also worry that it would cause tension with family members who would view it as their job to be my advocate.

cdillar1 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

I have a very close friend who is a doula, and since my husband is going to be in Afganistan, I can not be more thankful she offered to be there with me, I have the extra bonus with her that she has been there for other military wives who's husbands have not been able to be there for the births, also she is the pastor's wife of my church so I know she will also be there spiritually for me.

ContagousSmile07 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

after reading the description i will be calling my mother doula ((:

ashleymariesheafletchall |

Q&A: What's a doula?

In the last few months of my pregnancy, one of the many thoughts racing though my head was, "How will we get through this, when neither of us has done this before?!" My partner and I felt prepared for the baby, but were pretty clueless about the actual delivery. When we met Theresa, that doubt began to fade away. Getting to know Theresa was one of the greatest bonding experiences and emotional investments we could have made. Theresa made time for both of us as a couple and one on one. Our relationship grew into a friendship and by the time my water broke, Theresa had become a close confidant. During the labor, my partner was able to lean on Theresa for advice and support. And, I was able to lean on him. Theresa continually reassured me and encouraged me to keep focused on my baby. Deciding to have a doula was one of the most important and wonderful choices we made. I understood that having a birth coach could decrease the pain and duration of labor, but I didn't know that I could have such a positive birth experience. http://www.duelove.com/

drby126 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

While the father of the baby is an excellent support person, sometimes he's going to need to go to the bathroom, eat a sandwhich and take a nap especially if the labor is long. Doulas provide support for the family unit as a whole. I think it's a little unrealistic to expect the father to be the sole support for a process he probably has never experienced before.

missrayne |

Q&A: What's a doula?

Does anyone know at what point during my pregnancy should I contact a doula?

mrschili11 |

Q&A: What's a doula?

What's the difference between the nurses and a doula? I was hoping they would give me some advice in dealing with labor - not sure what they are there for now. Scary stuff...

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Q&A: What's a doula?

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Q&A: What's a doula?

visit www.byhisgracedoula.com

byhisgracedoula |

Q&A: What's a doula?

Check out my FAQ page on my doula website for my answers to what a doula is and what she can do for you during pregnancy and labor. http://www.kairosdoulas.com/frequently-asked-questions/ Allison Harris NCTMB,LMT,CD Kairos Holistic Healing Arts Birth Support Services

xoasisx |

Q&A: What's a doula?

Kairos Holistic Healing Arts Birth Support Services www.kairosdoulas.com

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Q&A: What's a doula?

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