log in | register Track your baby's growth

Your Avatar

Sign up to get FREE personalized newsletters about your baby each week.

Enter your due date or baby’s birth date:

Pregnancy Week by Week

Get a window on what’s happening in your pregnancy, week by week. From week four to week 42, your baby is experiencing a miraculous transformation from a clump of cells to a fully formed (and totally cute) newborn. Just imagine, as early as five weeks, your baby is already starting to form major organs (heart, stomach, liver, and kidneys) and systems (digestive, circulatory, nervous). By eight weeks, your raspberry-sized womb-mate is moving her arms and legs. At the beginning of your second trimester (week 14), your wee one is sucking his thumb. By week 28, the first week of the third trimester, baby (now as big as an eggplant) is prepping for breathing, developing his eyesight and packing on pounds in anticipation of life outside the womb. Each week is a new miracle. Less miraculous is how a mom-to-be may feel. Pregnancy Week-by-Week charts your baby’s development but also lets mom know what she might be feeling during each week of her pregnancy. Pregnancy week by Week includes everything mom needs to know to feel a sense of control over her pregnancy. Each week offers a complete guide to what you might feel, your must-do’s, your nice-to do’s, and answers and advice on everything pregnancy-related. Plus each week’s guide offers tips on maintaining a healthy and comfortable pregnancy from strategies on coping with pregnancy symptoms (morning sickness anyone?) to ideas for healthy eating, and pointers on talking to your OB. Let us guide you along your pregnancy, week by week.

More about pregnancy week-by-week Less about pregnancy week-by-week

baby registry

need to buy a gift?

Find baby registries (at top retailers!) and websites with one easy search.

what's hot around the web

baby websites

you asked...

Q&A: Ways to Avoid a C-Section?

I’m getting closer to my due date and am scared of having a c-section. Is there anything I can do to avoid it?

Re: I’m getting closer to my due date and am scared of having a c-section. Is there anything I can do to avoid it?

The Bump Expert

Not always. In most cases, cesarean sections happen because your baby can’t be delivered vaginally, no matter what you or your doctor does to help her along. You might need a c-section if your baby is breech (bottom first) or transverse (sideways). Your doctor can try to move the baby into the proper (head-down) position, but this doesn’t always work. You may also need a c-section if your baby is especially large or you have placenta previa (when the placenta covers the cervix and blocks baby’s exit).

Sometimes complications during labor force doctors to deliver a baby by c-section. If labor stalls (meaning the cervix stops dilating); your baby’s heart rate slows or becomes irregular; the umbilical cord slips through the cervix (a “prolapsed cord”); or the placenta separates from the uterine wall (placental abruption), your doctor will perform a c-section.

Try not to worry. Good prenatal care will boost your chances of delivering vaginally and handling any complications that might arise. No matter how baby travels from your uterus to your arms, you’ll be thrilled to pieces when she arrives!

Q&A: Ways to Avoid a C-Section?

1. Get a doula. Some of the reasons given for c-sections are ones that are debatable. Like having a baby that is 'too big' or 'stalled labor'. Changing positions, or just willing to wait it out can sometimes 'fix' these complications. A doula is a labor assistant with some medical knowledge and lots of experience, who can help you know if you should get a second opinion about what your doctor is proposing or if they're right on the money. 2. Try for a natural childbirth. The truth is, most women/babies are probably fine with epidurals or other pain medications, but some just don't tolerate it well. Narcotics can sometimes stall labor, and epidurals can cause fetal distress, maternal fever, and other complications that can lead to c-sections. Again, know your options, and the possible side-effects on you and your child. 3. If this is your first child, try not to induce unless there's a really good medical reason for it. C-section rates are higher in first-time mothers who are induced (I should know, I was one!) Also, not all induction methods are equal. It's better to be induced with cervadil than to have your water broken (which, by the way, creates a 20-hour time-limit in which you must have your baby or the doctors will want to do an automatic c-section). Pitocin is also somewhat controversial, and can cause complications too.

sandyoasis@gmail.com |

tools

My Pregnancy Calendar
Count down to delivery with your pregnancy calendar.
baby names
Browse 1000s of baby names in our Baby Namer tool.
pregnancy tickers
Create your own pregnancy ticker.
how big is baby
From poppyseed to papaya, see how baby grows each week.

>> See all tools