Pregnancy Week by Week

Get a window on what’s happening in your pregnancy, week by week. From week four to week 42, your baby is experiencing a miraculous transformation from a clump of cells to a fully formed (and totally cute) newborn. Just imagine, as early as five weeks, your baby is already starting to form major organs (heart, stomach, liver, and kidneys) and systems (digestive, circulatory, nervous). By eight weeks, your raspberry-sized womb-mate is moving her arms and legs. At the beginning of your second trimester (week 14), your wee one is sucking his thumb. By week 28, the first week of the third trimester, baby (now as big as an eggplant) is prepping for breathing, developing his eyesight and packing on pounds in anticipation of life outside the womb. Each week is a new miracle. Less miraculous is how a mom-to-be may feel. Pregnancy Week-by-Week charts your baby’s development but also lets mom know what she might be feeling during each week of her pregnancy. Pregnancy week by Week includes everything mom needs to know to feel a sense of control over her pregnancy. Each week offers a complete guide to what you might feel, your must-do’s, your nice-to do’s, and answers and advice on everything pregnancy-related. Plus each week’s guide offers tips on maintaining a healthy and comfortable pregnancy from strategies on coping with pregnancy symptoms (morning sickness anyone?) to ideas for healthy eating, and pointers on talking to your OB. Let us guide you along your pregnancy, week by week.

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you asked...

Why am I always hot during pregnancy?

Why do I feel hot all the time, and what can I do about it?

Re:

Why do I feel hot all the time, and what can I do about it?

The Bump Expert

Feeling overheated? Chalk it up to increased blood volume. During pregnancy, the amount of blood in your body increases by as much as 50 percent. To better handle all that extra blood, your blood vessels dilate slightly, allowing the blood to come of the surface, which can make you feel hot.

In the third trimester, your metabolic rate also increases, which can also add to that overheated feeling. You might find yourself sweating more too.

The good news? Your blood volume -- and internal thermostat -- will return to normal after delivery. Until then, you’ll have to find ways to deal with feeling hot. Consider dressing in light layers so it’s easy to add or remove clothing quickly as needed. You should also drink plenty of water. Staying well hydrated will prevent dehydration and make you feel more comfortable, especially when it’s hot outside. Consider investing in a couple fans -- we recommend having one on your desk at work and one in your bedroom.

Plus, more from The Bump:
10 Foods Moms-to-Be Should Eat for Baby

5 Ways to Survive a Summer Pregnancy

Pregnancy symptoms caused by hormones?

--Kelly Kasper, MD, OB/GYN and associate clinical professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine

Jennifer L.W. Fink

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