what's hot around the web

you asked...

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

What can I do to decrease my baby's risk of SIDS?

Re: What can I do to decrease my baby's risk of SIDS?

The Bump Expert

Every parent knows about SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome). It's rare, but probably a parent's worst nightmare. By definition, SIDS has no known cause -- and a very small percent of babies do die during sleep in their first year for no apparent reason. The American Academy of Pediatrics reports that nearly 2,500 babies die from SIDS each year in the US. The best way to decrease your baby's risk is to always keep him in a safe environment, including when he's sleeping... which he does a lot!

Lay baby on his back to sleep
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends putting babies to sleep on their backs. Studies show that more babies die when put to sleep on their stomach. We don't totally understand why this is, but it's simply a fact that babies are safer on their backs. Tummy time is fine when babies are awake (and important for exercise and development), but not for unsupervised sleep.

Get a good crib and firm mattress
Make sure your crib complies with current safety standards and has a firm mattress and well-fitting sheet.

Avoid fluffy bedding – including bumpers
You may think bumper pads are cute, but the AAP recommends against using them at all. While bumpers seem like a way to keep baby safe, studies found that they can suffocate, entrap and even strangle babies during sleep. There's also no evidence that says bumpers prevent injuries. Basically, stay away from anything that your baby could get trapped under when he wiggles around.

Take everything out of the crib
Don't worry about using special pillows and equipment to make your baby comfy -- he's just fine flat on his back. Never cover your baby's head with a blanket, avoid loose-fitting PJ's, and keep cuddly toys, blankets, pillows and stuffed animals out of the crib. If you want to use a light blanket to swaddle, that’s fine, but nothing else should be in the crib.

Same room, different bed
While you may want to cuddle with baby at night, this isn’t the best idea. Bed-sharing can expose your baby to additional risks, such as suffocation, asphyxia, entrapment, falls and strangulation, since the situation does not meet sleep safety standards. One study found that 13 percent of the surveyed SIDs victims died while bed-sharing. Another found that though breastfeeding helps reduce baby's SIDS risk, co-sleeping does not. The AAP does recommend room-sharing, where baby sleeps in the same room but on a separate surface. There is evidence that this arrangement decreases the risk of SIDS by as much as 50 percent, since a parent can keep a closer eye on baby.

Turn down the temp
Don't let baby get overheated -- he's just fine covered with a light blanket or a sleep sack. Studies show that heated bedrooms increase SIDS risk by about 4.5 percent, compared to non-heated rooms. Keep the room between 65 and 70 degrees to keep baby comfortable and safe.

Don’t smoke
Be sure to place the crib somewhere smoke-free. In fact, keeping baby away from smoke in general is a good idea – especially when they're still in the womb. Researchers have found that smoking during pregnancy nearly doubles the chance of SIDS for babies.

Seats are for sitting
SIDS used to be called "crib death," so some parents mistakenly believe that putting their baby to sleep on a bed, couch or bassinet will prevent it. This is a myth -- an approved crib is the safest place for a baby.

Even if baby falls asleep in the car seat or stroller, it’s best to transfer them to a crib (yes, even if you’re risking waking them up) if they’ll be asleep for a while. Because babies have poor head control, sleeping while sitting up might increase the risk of upper airway obstruction and oxygen desaturation.

Reducing your baby's risk of SIDS doesn’t have to cost money -- it's just about attention to details. Remember -- even though SIDS is rare, when it's your baby, you’ll want to do everything you can to prevent this from happening.

Updated September 2013

Dr. Vicki Papadeas

re: Q: Decrease SIDS Risk?

Some people will say that side sleeping is alright, but don't do it. Studies have also shown that side sleeping can increase the risk of SIDS (not as bad as tummy sleeping, but still worse than back sleeping). Remember, Back to sleep, no bumpers or extra blankets, pillows or toys, and you can decrease the risk of SIDS enormously.

lipp82 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I agree with the no loose blankets in the crib and for that matter no blankets whatsoever covering the baby. Dress your baby appropriately for the weather and they shouldn't need one or use a swaddle sack to help them sleep better. There is also a product from AngelCare which is made to prevent SIDS. A sensor is placed under the mattress of your baby's crib which is hooked up to a baby monitor and if the baby stops breathing and movement is not sensed in the crib the monitor goes off. I've heard it go off and its definately loud enough to not only notify you but to also snap your baby out of their sleep.

racquelcorrea |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I too am paranoid about SIDS. My LO is 10 weeks and she's a wiggler. We've long since stopped the swaddling because she's able to kick out of it (no matter how well we swaddle). She now sleeps in PJs or a sleep sack but, I cannot find a solution to her wiggling. It's to the point now that she knows how to wiggle onto her side. I've tried wedges that are equipped with side bumpers but she slides and wiggles out of that into some contorted position. I find myself waking up every hour or two just to check that she's on her back. I can't get any sleep for worrying.

mbdelissaint |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My baby was also wiggling on her side (she is 11 weeks) and we were told about the heavenly sleeper. It is a swaddle blanket and she is bound to where she can not turn. You can search miracleblanket online and it will get the website. It has also been featured in several bringing home baby episodes. We love it - 6 hours sleep and she stays warm.

rhondabeth |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My LO doesn't sleep well on her back. She's a side sleeper for sure. She stays by me when she sleeps so I can easily check on her throughout the night. While I was in Babies R Us yesterday I saw a crib sheet that's designed for use with a swaddled from the same company. You swaddle your child and then two extra Velcro tabs on the swaddler attach to two spots in the sheet to keep baby in one spot and her back while she sleeps. I thought that was kinda spiffy. The brand is Soothe Time and it's called a snooze sheet.

brunoshort |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

my S.O.'s father told me that we should get one of those triangle pillow things to make baby sleep on her side. i wasn't sure if this was a good idea or not, because i know back sleeping is good and tummy sleeping is BAD. but what about making her sleep on her side?

jazzy2012 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I am very paranoid when it comes to SIDS. I actually sleep holding my little girl. I wake up when she moves or needs to eat or spit up. It makes me feel better to be right there. I have been sleeping comfortably and so has she. So far, this has worked very well, but as she sleeps longer and goes longer between feedings, I will move her to her crib.

PORKCHOPJONES |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Letting your baby sleep with you can also have its consequences...the longer you allow it the harder it will be to put him/her in the crib to sleep. Babies do not need blankets or sheets to sleep. If you cannot keep your baby in a swaddle blank (the ones that are made with velcro and zippers to keep them in place) then put them in a sleeper. He/she will still be warm enough and will get used to self soothing to go to sleep.

ecarty |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My brother died as an infant from an allergic reaction to a prescribed medication and I almost lost another brother from an allergic reaction to penicillin. Luckily the paramedics were able to resuscitate him and he is doing well with gorgeous 2 kids. So I understand parent's fears about SIDS and it's no wonder that I became a homeopath. One of the things that I hear a great deal from parents is that they have a really hard time getting their infants who are naturally stomach sleepers to sleep through the night on their back. Some even report that the only way to get them to sleep is to put them on their stomachs, but then they worry about SIDS. We actually have homeopathic remedies that may be beneficial to help naturally stomach sleepers sleep more soundly on their backs. One of these remedies is "Medorrhinum" . Medorrhinum is a homeopathic remedy that requires a prescription from a homeopath and it's always advisable to consult with a professional homeopath experienced in treating infants who can make a proper assessment as to which remedy will be best for your baby.

GabrielleTraub |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I know that it is important for my son to sleep on his back but at 8 weeks he wasn't sleeping longer than 2 hours at a time and i had to go back to school. I started placing him on his tummy for naps and realized he'd nap for over an hour on his tummy while on his back he'd only nap for 30 minutes. Since he was 2 months old he has been sleeping on his tummy. That's 2.5 weeks now that he sleeps 8-10 hours straight at night. I have a regular monitor in there and I tend to wake up about every 3-4 hours to use the bathroom so I always poke my head in his room and listen or gently place my hand on his back to make sure he's okay.

firenygirl |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Cosleeping actually decreases SIDS. Cosleeping is not dangerous as long as you are not obese or under the influence, or just a complete moron. And vaccines have also been linked to SIDS. If you care at all about what you put in your babies body, you should do a little research on ingredients of these vaccines, it would shock and horrify you. Health does not come from a needle, don't believe these big pharma corporations have your best interest at heart because they don't... It's all about money...

arb703 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My son has slept on his stomach since he was born. He will be 4 months next weekend and i don't plan on changing his sleeping habit because morons tell me it bad. All the SIDS cases that involved babies sleeping on their stomaches were all because their sheets weren't tight enough and blankets, pillow, stuffed animals and other toys weren't taken out of their bed before putting them to bed. My family, for generations has put babies on their stomaches to sleep and nobody in my family has had a baby die from SIDS.

kahayslip |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Arb703: According to research co-sleeping is safer for babies when it comes to SIDS, but the research indicates that co-sleeping means having the baby in the same room as you...NOT sleeping in the same bed as you. It doesn't matter what size you are or how stupid or smart you are, you cannot control your movements when you are asleep. All it takes is on wrong move in your sleep for you to suffocate your baby. Having the baby in a co-sleeper near the bed or in a crib in your room is the safe part they talk about. And really, vaccines? They have done countless research on them and it has never been proven to cause SIDS.

reaustin18 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

The big preventive measure that has not been mentioned is breastfeeding. Breastfeeding is one of the best things you can do for you and your baby.

LeighAnneIBCLC |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

The two best ways to decrease the chance of SIDS: #1 Breastfeed #2 Co-sleep

Mrs.KLF |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My baby girl will be 4 months old next week and has been sleeping on her stomach since she was brought home from the hospital and is doing just fine, in a few years they will change the regulations again that babies should not sleep on their backs, soooo i say do what feels right to you. I am her mother and it feels right to let her sleep on her belly.

jann0125 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Follow your pediatricians recommendations for your infant. We invested in a Snuza Halo. It's a small device that clips into the diaper and monitors breathing. Unlike the Angel Care (or similar) monitors it is 100% portable. It can be used any where, any time and on babies that move a lot. If an infant wearing it stops breathing (or pauses too long between breathes) it vibrates to startle them into breathing. If that does not work it will audibly alarm - quite loudly too. Our son wore it his first year and I only had three false alarms all when he was older and pulled the Snuza off (along with his diaper!). It's the only reason I slept as well as he did that first year.

CassNY |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

my sister-in-law and brother did everything... my nephew slept on his back in his crib, etc. and my nephew still passed away from SIDs this last May. My daughter is 5 months old and I cannot fall asleep unless the baby monitor is on and i can see her. My pedi doc says my children are all at an increased risk of sids because my nephew died from it... also, my nephew died in the afternoon while at daycare... not at night. he told me the risk factors for sids are: first born child, male, hispanic, black, american indian, sleeps on stomach, exposure to smoke/smokers, cousins or siblings dying from sids, 2-4 months of age. the only risk factors my nephew had is he was almost 3 months and a boy. i was also told there is nothing you can do if it is a true sids. the angelcare alarm helps if it is a preemie that stops breathing due to development issues. i can't wait for my daughter to hit a year old because the risk dramatically drops then...

lynnandjohn03 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

glad to read other like-minded moms. we co-sleep and sometimes she sleeps in my arms. we don't vaccinate. i may consider it once she can communicate her headaches and such. she has already transitioned to a crib mattress on the floor next to our floor mattress. I'm sure the confidence she gains from feeling loved will continue to help her learn to self-sooth. I'm paranoid about SIDS too, so there is no belly sleeping and I try to keep her off her side. I guess more PJs and less blankets as she loves to pull them over her face in the last few days. But the midwife really encouraged co-sleeping. The pediatrician not so much, at hospital he did have a mother crush baby in her sleep. I have chronic pain and have had to wake to role over for years, so baby slept next to me - until she gained the confidence to sleep in the bed right next to us.

wesmythe |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

NPR did an article about this a while ago making public several studies saying that SIDS doesn't exist and it is a name incorrectly given to several ways babies can die - most of which attributed to a caregiver's fault. There were numerous studies about this as well that most "SIDS" cases have actually been the fault of a parent who made an incorrect sleep safety decision. Vaccines aren't to blame either, please, don't say things that simply aren't based in facts. This is how rumors get started and then babies get whooping cough and die. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/Concerns/sids_faq.html

veliskova |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

So sorry about your nephew. My son is 5mo and even though I put him to sleep on his back, he flips over in his sleep within 5 minutes. There's no way I can keep him on his back all night unless I tie him down or stay awake all night and watch him. Do the risks go down any once they can roll around on their own?

navagatrix |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Back sleeping is a definite must to reduce the risk of SIDS. Always lay LO down on his/her back, but it's okay to leave them if they roll. Use a firm mattress and a crib that meets all safety standards. It's important to avoid all loose fabrics, which includes blankets, bumpers, pillows, and soft toys. We always put LO to sleep in a Halo sleepsack (which even has the logo "back is best" printed on it). I definitely recommend going the sleepsack route to keep baby safely warm, which is practical because it can't be kicked off besides being safer. Other things to avoid include no smoking, offer a pacifier, avoid overheating (ideal temp is 68-72 degrees). We have a small fan in the room to circulate the air, which has the added bonus of providing white noise.

smitt2619 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

So arb703 I guess you won't be cosleeping because you sound like a complete moron.

vlewis515 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

i completely agree with the vaccine risk - the "research" that has been done to argue against the safety of vaccines is totally bias. they refuse to do autopsies on the central nervous systems of babies who die from SIDS, which is exactly the system that the toxins in vaccines attack. it IS all about money. a parent should research this beyond what the media, most doctors and pediatricians, and parenting books/magazines would report. there's plenty of non-government funded research the reveals the truth. one great resource is http://naturalnews.com/vaccines.html. you can't believe everything you hear from the authorities and "experts" these days.

sarahjaclyn |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

sorry - meant to say the research that has been done to argue FOR the safety of vaccines is totally bias....

sarahjaclyn |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My daughter is 5 months old and REFUSES to sleep on her back or side. She always is on her tummy. How do I safely get her on her back? Also, she learned to roll over onto her tummy while in the sleep sac, swaddle sacs, and miracle wraps.

NicoleMilan |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Ive been extremely paranoid about SIDS since a friend of mine lost her 10 week old one week before my DS was born! I was devastated and the fear grew exponentially because I knew she was not a neglectful parent. I have been vigilant with my husband and my mother in law(who is constantly insisting on baby sleep overs) that he sleeps in a sleepsack only and I swaddle up his legs so to make sure he not only stays warm without overheating but to keep him still, it really helps him sleep. I have a video monitor that is faced across his belly so I can constantly look over at the monitor when I wake up at night to make sure I see breathing, which I get joked on for sometimes because he sleeps less than 10 feet away from us in his crib! I didn't feel a regular crib sheet was enough padding for him because he was constantly moving his head back and forth and would get frustrated trying to find a comfortable spot so I tucked a more plush blanket under his crib sheet. You can call me paranoid but there's no way I'm letting anything happen to my boy!

Swilliams86 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

We formula feed, she sleeps in another room, and we vaccinate. She coslept as a small infant as it was easier. Regardless at 8 months, she's healthy, smart, and strong as all heck and I would never change what I've done. Truth is you can't prevent SIDS. The sooner mamas realize this the better theyll feel. I had a friend who breast fed, coslept, baby on his back and no blankets, no bumpers.. Died in his sleep at 5 weeks. Not to scare anyone, but there's no method to defeating SIDS. Be smart, that's all.

katiexbones13 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My son slept with a paci until he was 4 months old. He was swaddled and slept next to me. He slept in one of those vibrating infant chairs that are angled at about 50 degrees on his back. He's also the first born, fully Hispanic male. We just celebrated his 1st birthday. :)

chiquis514 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Anyone freak out that leaving a baby choking on spit up or vomit while on their back? I know research says put a baby on their back to sleep but what about those infants with acid reflux? Sure you can elevate them but that doesn't always help. My son is almost 3 months and has it. Before he for meds for it I would be woken up by him struggling to breathe because of the stuff caught in his throat. So now he sleeps elevated and on his side with a wedge to keep him there.

Txhawkins |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Experts do not know at all what causes this....my LO has been sleeping on his stomach since he was a month old (6 months now) and he is fine. He had such horrible gas that sleeping on his belly relieved it and he could sleep through the night. You have to do what works for you. My aunt's son died of SIDS last year and she followed everything the experts did. Me and my sister slept on our bellies, with heavy blankets and tons of stuffed animals in our crib and we both made it. It is a horrible thing that happens and I wish they could truly tell us why.

jyoung1972 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Okay, so I had a son die of SIDS at daycare a few years ago and have worked closely with SIDS Resources and done some research. Those sleep positioners that a lot of people are talking about are actually dangerous. Many babies roll for the first time or get caught in them and die. I know they are marketed to reduce SIDS but this is untrue. Second, the Angel care monitor does not prevent SIDS. It will just warn you if your baby is not moving or breathing. You can reduce the risk of SIDS by having the baby sleep on his/her back in a crib with a tight fitting firm mattress that is free of loose blankets, bumpers, toys, etc. Also not smoking or allowing anyone to smoke around your baby during pregnancy and after. Giving the baby a pacifier has been shown to reduce the risk as well as co-habitating (room sharing) NOT bed sharing (co-sleeping) have been shown to reduce the risk as well.

mallettjulie |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I'm not sure how breastfeeding prevents SIDS...???

NicoleMilan |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My son is 16 weeks old and has refused to sleep on his back since we brought him home. We follow all the other 'rules' for SIDS prevention tho-he sleeps in a sleeper, firm mattress, tight sheet, cool temp, in our room. Doctor suggests he stay in parents room (cosleeping) until at least 6mths. I've been terrified of SIDS also..but like most of yall, my doctor said vaccines are fine, there's no link to them to SIDS.. But reading that they refuse to do biopsy on infants who died from sids central nervous system is freaking me out!! We allowed our sons first round of vaccines but am thinking not to do the next ones. :( ..we as parents have enough to worry about, now we have to worry if our children's vaccines that are govmt regulated are truly safe for them??

alc2911 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Also we purchased an AngelCare sound and movement monitor which helped me to feel comfortable enough to actually sleep without checking every few hrs:) My pediatrician said do not prop them w/blankets or pillows to keep them on their belly! Once they're able to turn onto their side or belly you know they can move around if they need to.

ccsmommy |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

When my son Cainen was born we bought a sids monitor because I was so scared of sids I can say it was well worth it. With the moniter it helped me actually get some sleep at night.

cainen |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

For God's sake! Who are these people who are recommending not vaccinating or putting babies to sleep on their tummies? Do you live in the Middle Ages or what? Why on earth would you INCREASE the chances for your babies to DIE! Don’t you read or listen to your Dr’s recommendation? How will you feel if it turns out that your baby dies because of a stupid decision you made? And what’s even worse: you are not only putting your baby in danger, but mine as well: your not-vaccinated baby is spreading diseases to other babies. You say you might consider vaccinating when baby can communicate if he has a headache? Are you out of you mind? Do babies die of a headache? I didn’t think so. And those mothers recommending putting babies to sleep on their tummies? It is bad enough to be an ignorant, but it’s even worse to recommend other people to follow your lead. There are scientists and Dr’s who have been researching SIDS for decades. YOU DON’T KNOW BETTER THAN THEM! Internet is full or rumors, alarmist theories and ideas that most of the times are completely false. Just as a test, try to find groups of people who had evidence that the end of the word was yesterday. I’m sure you’ll come up with a few hundreds. Good luck all of you, but please stay away from advising others. That’s a Dr’s job.

elemunoz |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

We use the Rock n play by Fisher Price to have our LO in our room. It works perfectly for co-sleeping, reflux and preventing him from rolling on side/stomach. He did not like being swaddled so we use a footed sleeper with nothing else around him.

Cncnorman |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My concern with sleeping on the back is if a child vomits and actually winds up chocking on his/her vomit. My little guy is now 6 months old and is able to turn himself around (and around and around!). He always finds a way to sleep on his belly which we were concerned about and discussed with his dr. His ped said we can put him on his back all we want, but he will still make his way to his belly so let him be.

patri617 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Babies will not choke and die if lying on their backs, and vaccines do not cause SIDS or autism. If your child has a legitimate case of GERD or some other significant health issue, then your pediatrician may recommend tummy sleeping or something else (like a nap nanny)- but you should discuss this with your pediatrician. I am so tired of hearing from people who do not vaccinate. I think that it is time for non-vaxed folks to move to their own separate communities so that our vulnerable babies and others with weak immune systems can stop getting horrible diseases. My worst nightmare is being out somewhere with my 8 week old and having them encounter the children of someone who chooses not to vaccinate. This is something that we should all be worried about.

minibub |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My son is 3 months and did not like sleeping on his back after the second week of birth. I put him on his stomach and he sleeps like a champ. Afterall, most all adult were placed on their stomachs for sleeping! But one thing I registered for and was so happy to get was a MOVEMENT MONITOR by Angelcare. It detects movement as little a baby breathing whether on their backs or stomachs. If no movement is detected in 20 seconds, it beeps loud. It's just that one added measure of comfort for my husband and I. And I highly recommend it!

Jasmyne1 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Wow. There's so many mixed reviews on here it's unreal. First off- breastfeeding helps prevent SIDs because babies supposedly spit up less when they are breastfed vs formula fed. (I do not know since my kids are formula fed) Secondly- some kids sleep on their stomachs/sides- that's life, gotta do whatever you can to keep them safe. Third- Vaccinations are not linked to SIDs whatsoever, they've been linked to causing autism because of the preservatives in them that attacks a child's immune system (but the shots have changed since the studies were done). For the fourth and final- the co sleeping (as in the same room) is a good idea but having a baby sleep next to you is risky. I admit I've let both my kids share our bed but probably shouldn't have, they're both alive and healthy so obviously doing something right or just dumb lucky. Sorry to those who have lost loved ones, it'd save everyone a lot of grief if doctors could figure this SIDs stuff out and tell us how to prevent it. By the way, home remedies/herbal remedies are strictly for adults (over 18 years old)- not for babies so not sure about that homeopath medicine you're promoting GabrielleTraub.

mrsosier |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My daughter is 7 months and from the moment she was able to roll herself over shes been sleeping on her stomach (I put her to bed on her back, she rolls over within 10 seconds). We follow the other rules for SIDS prevention: no toys or blankets in the crib, breathable bumpers, firm mattress, etc but shes formula fed and sleeps in a crib in the next room and I can't obsessively be worrying every 5 minutes about SIDS because I'll make myself crazy. I use caution and I check the video monitor every so often and if I think shes too still I'll go in and make sure shes ok but I have to agree with some of the people here that you can do everything exactly perfect and your chld is still at risk for SIDS. Be smart about it but constantly worrying about it is only going to put more stress on yourself. And I'm sorry but I completely believe in vaccinating my child, not only for their health but also the health of the children around them. Do you realize that if you don't vaccinate your child and they contact measles they can also die from that just like they can die from SIDS?? Or if your child contacts measles and passes it on to my infant before shes old enough you can kill my infant?? The benefits of vaccinations totally outweigh the risks and anyone who obsessively worries about SIDS should also be worrying what those diseases will do to your child if they are not vaccinated and they contact any of them

HLANGELICO |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

if your baby has reflux having them sleep at an angle will help, but don't use something soft to do it. I'm sure there are ways to angle the mattress. My son actually slept in his carseat for the first 2 months (due to reflux). The angle was perfect and I was able to keep him in our room so I could nurse him. We then moved to a pack n play in our room and by 6 mths he was in a crib (without bumpers, pillows etc). It is possible to do. I also don't understand people saying their babies "won't" sleep on their backs. Really? So if you lay them on their backs, or rock them they will be up for days at a time? Or are they are being babies and NOT sleeping thru the night at 6 weeks? Babies are supposed to be up to eat every few hours. That's how they are programmed. I don't understand people fighting the recommendations.....if you told me I needed to stand on my head in order to reduce my sons risk of sids i'd do it!

KASH4 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

elemunoz..u made some valid points.. But I am one of the parents who allows my child to sleep on their tummy-my DOCTOR said it was ok because he has reflux. He can now roll over (at 16 weeks) from his back to his belly, so even when I lay him on his back, he turns over (also oked by his DOCTOR). Listen..I'm not trying to give advise to anyone, all I'm trying to do is allow my child to live a long, healthy life.. And that means doing my research and not always listening to what the govmt says is true/false. The decision to/to not vaccinate is the biggest decision I will make for my child. What if we continue to do them and he becomes autistic? Or they find out there IS a link to autism or sids? ..And what if we don't and he gets polio or some other horrible disease?? Or worse..dies because of our decision?? .being a parent isn't black and white. Unfortunatly, there's a lot of gray areas. Its up to us to do our own research.. talk to doctors, read, talk to other parents who have dealt with these issues, etc. But we can't just rely on what the govmt tells us is safe or not. We are the parents. I love my son more than anything in this world, and I will continue to research, pray and use my own instincts to do what's best for him.

alc2911 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

The idea that breastfeeding decreases SIDS is because of the antibodies in the breastmilk that formula cannot recreate. So, if your baby has a little cold or respiratory infection, the risk of the mucus taking over their breathing passages is lessened dramatically. Another thing about the vaccines, I have a friend who had a court order to NOT have her two children vaccinated because of the risk of autism and SIDS and guess what.. they are BOTH autistic. and the theory behind tummy sleeping is that the infants will 're-breathe' their own air and their bodies balance of Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen will be flipped on it's head and they can die of oxygen deprivation. My son when first brought home from the hospital would ONLY sleep on me or my husbands chest on his belly and after a couple sleepless nights of trying to get him to sleep in the crib on his back, he finally got used to it and now, will not sleep anywhere else. If anything is unclear to the non vaccinating, not back sleeping, non crib sleeping parents, it is all spelled out here. These are the professionals http://www.sids.org/nprevent.htm . I don't think SIDS should be something to take so lightly as to find ways that only work for you.

Swilliams86 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Vaccines DO NOT cause SIDS, nor do they cause autism! Doing real "research" does not entail googling SIDS, vaccines, or autism. I am floored by the things people are telling each other here! The safest place for your baby is alone, on their back, in a crib. No bumpers, blankets--NOTHING else need be in the crib with your baby. We lose more babies to SIDS who were co-sleeping than you realize. Furthermore, not vaccinating your child puts them at serious risk for PERFECTLY PREVENTABLE illnesses. Many of these illnesses can kill a child. Illnesses we haven't seen for decades are making a comeback because of a surge of parents who refuse to vaccinate. Newborns too young for vaccinations are put at risk by those in the community who are not vaccinated! Research pertussis, polio, mumps... not everything is a government conspiracy...use your brains, people!!! Thank God we live in a country where we have these vaccines available! Vaccines are one of the things that has helped increase our life expectancy. Celebrities who advocate against vaccinating your child because of an erroneous belief that doing so causes autism are tragically irresponsible. If you are still clueless and choose to believe celebrities etc. over the American Academy of Pediatrics, then ask yourself this: risk autism (if you really believe this) or risk the very real possibility of death due to preventable illness?

vtlsgns |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

In addition to the properties of breastmilk described above, breastfeeding and cosleeping work together to reduce SIDS because mother and baby share inter-dependent breathing patterns and sleep cycles when their bodies are close to each other. Their patterns allow the mother to be naturally responsive to the baby's needs throughout sleeptime, so if baby has any distress, mom will naturally awaken to address them. It's what humans (and mammals) are engineered to do. Smoking, drugs, alochol and obesity will challenge this, so cosleeping/breastfeeding moms need to avoid these risk factors for suffaction, which is NOT the same as SIDS. (On an unrelated note, it makes me cringe to see how susceptible people are to complete BS from ignorant physicans, whom they trust blindly while calling out the government and big pharma, as if there were some vast conspiracy. You've obviously googled just enough to have your eyes and brain only half open to science.)

KKmamaKK |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

"Suffocation," of course, not "suffaction." Must have been typing with too much haste. Sorry.

KKmamaKK |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I think another source of the vaccine/SIDS propaganda is if you lose your child to SIDS, there is no way (at least me) will be able to believe that my child mysteriously stopped breathing in their sleep. I am extremely sympathetic to SIDS parents and I think I would probably blame anything too. Research is now saying that SIDS is being attributed to insufficient serotonin levels which regulate baby's oxygen intake. Babies are born with this defect and there is no way of testing it yet. There are of course other reasons babies die in their sleep like suffocation, choking, or just being sick, this is not SIDS those factors, in most cases, are entirely preventable if you follow proper protocol

Swilliams86 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

You are right, we do classify these things under the umbrella of SIDS. Obviously, co-sleeping increases the risk for suffocation...as a parent, I want to do everything possible to prevent this. Better put, co-sleeping (by this I mean in the same bed) does not decrease or prevent suffocation or SIDS, but you do so at the risk accidental suffocation.

vtlsgns |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

For generations my family has been putting their babies on their stomach to sleep . i've done the same with my daughter and she sleeps 10+ hours a night , takes regular naps and is an all around happy baby . My mothers friend but her sons on their backs, followed all health and safety standards and they both died (at 2 and 4 months) due to choking on their spit-up.

rahrah92 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

If really want to decrease the risk of SIDS then don't vaccinate and breast feed. Breast milk contains natural antibodies. Vaccines contain toxins. If you must vaccinate wait till the child is older.

lkaymoretti |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

SO I've seen those provocative ads that state "your baby's final resting place" and shows the headboard of the family bed---How Horrid! Why would these stupid ads blame the parent? My baby was 5.8lbs when she was born. The nurses stressed how skin to skin was best, as she was just above a preemie at birth. She was never considered premature though. SO for a good portion of her early months I slept naked in a bathrobe with her on my chest, on her tummy, her cheek resting against my breast. Sometimes I tied the robe around us both. I had one of my dogs in bed on top of the blankets between my legs preventing me from rolling over. I became a back sleeper for 7 months. MY Pediatrician says that as soon as your child can lift it's head up and flip over, generally they are safe from SIDS. We have a family bed. I have always been super vigilant so I don't worry. Plus, our futon is on the floor now, so if she crawls away, I don't have to worry about her falling from a height. And yes we do use a crib now, she's 11 mos old. I would do it again in heart beat, skin to skin.

mkellymurphy |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Everyone who says, "Our generation slept on our bellies and we're fine" is forgetting the fact that several of "our generation" died from SIDS. That's such false logic! Yes, many many babies will be just fine and will survive, but some of them won't. Also, yes, some babies who sleep on their backs will die from SIDS, too, but the studies show that the statistics favor back sleeping. Period. Get a grip, people, and do real research!

baleydyan |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I think people need to check their emotions when responding to things like this. I understand beliefs are very strong especially on specific topics, mine are too, but there is no need to belittle or demean others. Every has an opinion and is free to share it. SIDS is a very serious issue, considering it involves death, so emotions are going to be high. Personally I think if doing something can decrease the risk of my child dying even by 1/100th of a percent I will do it!!! I have had this argument with my mother and mother in law and always get "well that's how I raised you and you were fine." To me this is not a good answer. As mentioned in the first post the chances of SIDS are rare but if it happens to your child it doesn't feel rare. I have a friend that lost their 2 month old to SIDS and I guarantee you they don't say "well it is rare." They do regret putting their baby to sleep on her belly though. We don't know if that is the cause, and probably never will, but they will always wonder "what if.". I don't ever want to have to deal with that question. I think if you have done the research and determine that you are comfortable with the risks or think that their is no risk then this is your decision as a parent. Until it is considered child abuse to put your child on their back or stomach or co-sleep or whatever patents have to decide what they are comfortable with.

Summer413 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I agree with back sleeping. It's just that my LO has torticollis and turns his head. Now, his skull is asymmetrical (plagiocephaly) and in my opinion, that is worse than him getting a flat spot on the back of the head. If I can't get the helmet through insurance, he will develop his muscles asymmetrically, perhaps develop a crooked face, and have problems with anything involving balance. They don't tell you that when you leave the hospital, or in any literature when educating about SIDS. Tummy time is super important to lessen the head flattening, but doesn't fix this. Some infants have to go to a craniofacial specialist and even get surgery to correct the problem. I think that there needs to be a solution to head deformities when telling parents to have their infants sleep on their backs. While stomach sleeping is dangerous, previous generations did not have crooked heads. I'll take a crooked head to death, but please offer me an answer as to how to fix my baby's crooked skull, and potentially crooked face?

gfilias |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

BREASTFEEDING! There are several studies and scholarly articles that show a significant reduction in the number of SIDS cases among breastfed babies. The longer the baby is breastfed, the longer his/her risk is lowered. Thus, the longer you can breastfeed your baby, the better. My plan is to breastfeed until my LO is either talking or walking, as both are likely to happen around one year. I had a heck of a time getting my LO to breastfeed as he was a preemie and not ready for much of anything. But we're five months in and going strong!

EABaby |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

well my little man has slept on his stomach since he was 2 months old and he sleeps with a lose blanket. if he gets too hot he kicks it off. Babies arnt stupid, if they cant breath they will move their npse out of the mattress and if too hot they kick the blanket off. Im still following the old school way, because my nan had 6 kids and they were all fine and so is my little man

purpleaura87 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I am concerned for swilliams comment about adding a plush blanket under her baby's sheet for more comfort. I believe that is dangerous and why they suggest a firm mattress and tight sheet. Anything soft can cause the trapped air /carbon monoxide mentioned above in one post. I almost lost my daughter 22 years ago, during a nap In the day. At that time they recommended stomach sleeping. We had bought a very expensive but soft mattress thinking it would be more comfortable. Thank God we had a monitor and his divine intervention I heard a strange noise and went to check on her. She was purple . Long story short the paramedics got there quickly and 911 operators gave instructions to my mother in law for me to do infant CPR. We went through days of testing at hospital and left on apnea monitor. My recommendations are LEARN INFANT CPR, and follow all the SIDS recommendations and tell your doctor everything about your baby's sleep space..for day and night. We never dreamed that mattress could cause our baby her life! BTW the SIDS institute in Atlanta were wonderful! Counseled me almost daily through my anxiety during her first year! I hardly think they would be quiet if they had ANY belief that vaccinations could cause it. They are compassionate people doing everything they can to fight it! I am now a new grandmother and so thankful for the awareness you all have, I knew nothing before my experience.

paladins37 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My son is 5months old an sleeps on his stomach..he wont sleep any other way. if you make sure the sheet is flat and fitted and see that nothing blocks their nose...they are completely fine. For goodness sake...babies dont just die for NO reason...if you read the freaking list of what NOT to do..its pretty much anything that can smother the baby. would you like it if someone restrained you or told you how to sleep?no,let them be an regularly check on them. My son slept with me first 3months because i breastfed him...i wouldnt reccomend it if your a heavy sleeper,i did wake up once with the blanket over his face so yes theres a danger to EVERYTHING. STOP worrying about it, if you are so paranoid just get a porta crib an put it beside your bed an dont even put a sheet on it leave it as is with nothing in there other than a blanket on the baby..my son still sleeps in his by our bed an i can regularly look at him an make sure all is okay an it helps me sleep.

thebrittany2110 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

We are all mothers and all of our children are different. If it doesn't feel right to you, don't do it. SIDS doesn't just happen sometimes, LIFE happens. You can do all the right things and bad things can still occur.

screnshaw89 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I am Australian, and recently a study found that in the last 3 years, of all babies to die from SIDS (72), nearly half (33) were due to co-sleeping. I use the Angelcare monitor, as well as a special swaddle we have called the wrap me up swaddle - http://www.lovetodream.com.au/babySwaddle_swaddle.htm - you can get them on ebay to post internationally. This swaddle allows the baby to sleep with his arms up in the air which is comfy for them, but also makes it impossible to roll on to their tummy while wearing one. They are a godsend!

saremcc |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I agree with "purpleaura87".Too many of you are overly paranoid... you shouldn't spend your time stressing about SIDS, especially when there is no definite cause... you'll just drive yourself crazy. Enjoy the time you spend with your baby during the day, and get some sleep at night instead of waking every hour to make sure your baby is still breathing.

AlyciaMorgan |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Both of my girls were tummy sleepers. My oldest will be 2 in Nov. and my youngest will be 1 in Dec. it didn't matter how I put them to sleep! When they woke up, they would be on their bellies, clear across their beds! They had bumpers and blankets and even stuffed animals! This is how I was raised, and I am still alive and doing just fine! I'm not saying this to stir anything up, or raise an argument! I'm just stating what I have done and how it has worked for me, just as everybody else! :)

TattooedMommy2 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I just wonder... those of you who are swearing up and down that vaccines do not contribute to SIDS or Autism, and telling others who might think so to do research, what sort of research have you done that supports your belief that they don't contribute to those two things? You can't argue that people are being foolish for believing those things if you yourself haven't actually put the time and effort into researching what you have accepted to be true. Personally, I would be devastated if I lost my baby... as would, I'm positive, every other mother posting on here. While I might not agree with some parents' decisions on how to care for a baby (e.g. co-sleeping), I trust that they are trying to make the best decision for their child. I would hope that others would recognize that as well and exercise a bit more respect and understanding when posting responses on this and other boards/forums/questions.

quizgirl |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I did intend on removing the blanket when hes able to roll over on his own, right now he is 11 weeks and can barely roll on his side so i dont worry about whats under his head yet

Swilliams86 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I have a 4 1/2 month old daughter who WILL NOT sleep on her back, and hasn't been a fan of it since she was born. The only way she would sleep when she was really little was if I was holding her or if she was in her bouncer or swing. Now that she knows how to roll over, it doesn't matter if I put her on her back, she'll just roll to her stomach and fall right to sleep. She doesn't sleep with extra blankets or anything, and I always make sure her sheets are nice and smooth, so I don't personally worry much. SIDS is my absolute greatest fear, but I don't feel like there is anything I can do to get her to sleep on her back now that she can just roll herself over. Someone told me to try the swaddlers but she gets enough momentum to roll over anyway, and the idea or her arms being stuck to her sides and not being able to lift herself up scares me worse than her sleeping on her stomach. Any ideas?

kimberlymautz |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

First off, if we all know tummy sleeping/blankets/bumpers have all been linked to death of an infant, why in the world would anyone risk it? If a baby can roll over on their own (like my son) that's one thing. They are usually a little bit older and their diaphram is more developed. The fear of belly sleeping is mainly due to 3 things. 1- the rebreathing of oxygen. 2- lose blankets/ sheet. 3- Infants have underdeveloped diaphrams. When on their belly, their chest cavity is too heavy for them to breath properly. It's in medical books. Breastfeeding is best because babies are never as full from breastmilk as they are from formula. So they tend to wake up more often and wake up easier out of super deep sleep, therefor there is not as much risk for not waking up do to breathing problems. A baby sleeping through the nights at early ages is not a common thing. They need to be able to wake up. Thats the healthies thing to keep from deep sleeping. I'm really shocked more people don't know these things. Many things our parents did back in the day have been proven to be potentialy harmfull. Just because we are alive does NOT make them all right things... we are just lucky. My rule of thumb is if I have to question myself over and over again on something, I just don't do it. Better safe than sorry,

SammieC311 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My 20 week old was rolling over from back to tummy by 4 months and so during his 4 mo check up the pediatrician recommended to still to lay him on his back at night, but if he rolls over onto his tummy, don't stress too much about it or keep flipping him back.

mocay |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

a book I recommend is Our Babies, Ourselves. It has great research in it. Having your baby in the same room is better because hearing you breathe helps, also you will wake easier if something is wrong. Also c-sections increase the risk of side, it may just be sceduled ones (as in done before you actually go into labor naturally. Some research shows you go into labor because the baby releases a hormone basically saying, "My lungs are ready!' So when you take the baby before then their lungs may not be fully mature. Written from my phone, so sorry if typos

flyabuv |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

not sure where the person saying that "co-sleeping is dangerous" is getting their information from, but all of the credible sources i have read about co-sleeping suggest it is MUCH safer than crib sleeping. mothers and babies are meant to sleep with each other. they are not only subconsciously aware of each other, but while sleeping the mothers body and breathing keeps the infant in a more arousable state throughout the night. i read some very cool actual experiments done that monitored breathing and heart rates when a baby slept with its mother and when it slept in a separate room and the results were staggering! really you would not believe the difference it made. do not get me wrong, sometimes co-sleeping can be dangerous when done unsafely, but the infant will more than likely die from some type of accident, not actual SIDS. there are plenty of website that give tips on how to safely co-sleep with your infant, as well as MANY others that support co-sleeping and its benefits. also breastfeeding is another good way to lower the risk of SIDS.

Trina411 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I'm very sorry to all those here that have lost infants or know of someone who lost theirs to SIDS, this is something that worries me as a new mother. My baby is 5 wks old now she is breastfed and still co-sleeps at my bedside. We have a moses basket that is place on a to chairs just high enough for her to be even with our bed and I have an angelcare monitor under the basket for added peace of mind. I've noticed as time goes by that I still wake up regularly just to look at her so I'm considering getting the new angelcare monitor with video for when we move her to her crib in her room. That way I don't find myself getting up just to look at her. We have another angelcare monitor under her playmat (where she usually naps during the day) and have actually had that alarm go off a couple of times. It give me added comfort whether the monitor beeping snapped her out of it, me tapping her did or maybe it was just a false alarm, but I'd still rather be safe than sorry. We also use a sleep sack anytime shes going down for naps or sleeping for the night. No she doesn't like having her arms put down to her sides at first and sometimes she fights it for 5 mins or so but in the long run she sleeps better and I don't have to worry about anything getting up in her face by accident. If she falls asleep in her swing or bouncer I don't move her but I put a monitor by her for sound if I'm leaving the room and if she's in a deep sleep and I don't notice movement I'll tap her leg or foot to get her to move to make sure she's ok. It would absolutely destroy me with what if's if something happened to my baby girl and I hadn't done everything in my power to prevent it.

2129hagan |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

We breastfeed and co-sleep here too, for lots of reasons, SIDS prevention is just one of them. A friend of mine that was pregnant at the same time as me had her son a month before me and he died at the age of 2 months due to SIDS. I have pretty well lived in fear since. When you've never met anyone that this happened to it's just not the same anymore once you have. It is certainly any mom or dads worst nightmare. I recently read that babies have sleep apnea and stop breathing for 15 seconds-ish now and then during deep sleep and that this is normal but it is also normal for them to begin breathing again and when they don't, that is (linked to) SIDS. I think if you co-sleep either in your bed or just in the same room this could help prevent SIDS because baby will hear normal noises from their parents sleeping and help them realize their surroundings at all times and hopefully help them to start breathing again during those periods of apnea. I need to do much more research on the topic honestly...it is very scary.

tobemomof3 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

READ THIS. http://www.thinktwice.com/sids.htm

AnimlNitr8 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Our first born daughter died from SIDS at 6 months old. It is absolutely devastating but through this experience we are now extremely educated on safe sleep and how to prevent SIDS. I suggest following all the preventative measures of safe sleep provided by the SIDS professionals and always be aware of your baby"s sleeping environment. Those of you who have day care or someone babysitting always make sure that they are completely educated on safe sleep also. When SIDS occurs there's no coming back from it. CPR does not work and it's a complete mystery that is tirelessly being researched to find out why this happens to our perfect little miracles. I am not trying to scare any of you Mom's and Dad's out there but I have been through it and never want to see or hear of it happing to anyone ever again. So please always make sure your child is put to sleep on his/her back no matter if its bedtime or a nap with nothing else in his/her sleeping area whether it be a crib or a bassinet . Also educate yourselves on co-sleeping. No matter how badly all of us new and seasoned parents want to snuggle with our little ones all night or for nap time, it is way to high of a risk to take the chance on something we have absolutely no control over or can foresee happening. Educate yourselves by checking out the SIDS website. There are safe sleep sacks and many great preventative measures on how to prevent SIDS from happening. 2-4 months is the most dangerous months for SIDS to occur but it can happen up to a year of age. We now have a beautiful baby boy and are very cautious and making sure we do everything as safe as possible, not that we didn't before, but when you experience something of that nature like losing a child, the littlest things make a world of difference for your piece of mind. Hope I have been helpful and hope every single baby survives and lives a strong, healthy, long life, because they deserve nothing less.

jgm51177 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

well, I think that I'll pray to the good Lord, and He will keep my wee one well.

Producadropaduece |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Trina411, Please go back and re-check your facts. Your information is incorrect and outdated. There are over 20 peer reviewed scientific studies that show bedsharing to be dangerous - **especially** for infants under four months of age. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development states that a baby is 20 times more likely to die while sleeping in an adult bed than if they were in a crib. That same study showed the risk as high as 40 times more likely in some circumstances. BEDSHARING HAS NEVER BEEN SHOWN TO PREVENT OR REDUCE THE RISK and I challenge anyone who claims otherwise to provide a link to the scientific study that demonstrates their claim. Most of all - when you give out this false and misleading advice, you are jeopardizing the lives of innocent babies. Just because you *think* something is right or your baby lived through being placed at risk, does not mean that it's ok.

TamJ81 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I am so sorry to hear those of you that have lost a child or know someone that has. Parents shouldn't have to bury their children. It's not supposed to be like that. My heart goes out to you.

bellacheesehead |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I keep reading about putting your baby to sleep on their back...my daughter is 5 months and automatically rolls over on to her stomach...should i constantly check on her and put her back on her back??

ismile9801 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

1. PRAYER 2. Fisher Price Rock N Play sleeper at my bedside. My 3 month old daughter sleeps all through the night in it. It provides an incline and keeps her on her back. You can get it from walmart.com for around $45 or BabiesRUs for $59.99 and can be moved anywhere. 2. Breastfeeding 3. Skin to skin (kangarooing) 4. Snuza Halo anytime she's asleep including naps at home or at daycare (worth every penny and better than Angel care because it's portable. Before this I was so crazy and fearful I would sleep in the nursery chair holding my daughter all night. 5. Fan to circulate air 6. No blankets, sleep sacks only once she breaks free from swaddling. 7. No bumper pads, toys stuffed animals etc. 8. Firm mattress, tight fitting sheet. 9. Pacifier until she spits it out in the night. 10. No vaccines - I don't let your kids around my kids for those of you who say my child will "infect" your child. I don't let people especially children touch my daughter. Our entire family has had the adult whooping cough vaccine. -love them, protect them, never inject them - vaccinetruth.com 11. Unconditional love and if it does happen you did everything to keep your baby safe and that was just God's plan. It won't take away the pain, but you will know it wasn't something you could have done different.

Momof1pdabby |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I will agree with the Fisher Price Rock N Play sleeper to keep them on their backs. My daughter, who is now 7 months old, slept really well in the rocker the first 4 or so months- she did NOT sleep well flat on her back- the sleeper kept her elevated and cozy- it was great. It also still worked well when she got sick a few months ago- again with the elevation.

melfranke |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I use the breathable bumper b/c my baby likes to put her face in it and i was scared to put a regular bumper. when it comes to sleeping though, im sorry but i have to stray away from what they say. Since my daughter was basically brought home she was sleeping on her belly and she doesnt like being swaddled. i do put a light blanket on her too. Babys are not stupid they know how to turn their heads, they arent going to sleep facedown, no one does. Why is it that all our parents put us on our bellys and we all survived obviously but now its not ok??? Its just that they dont know what causes SIDS so they are trying to come up with any explanation. BUT, everyones parenting styles are different, this works for my daughter and this is my opinion.

MrsVickyA |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I had a son pass away from SIDS when he was 8 weeks old. I breastfed for 6 weeks. He slept in his crib in the room with us. My husband and I dont smoke. He used a paci mildly. I also have a twin sister who lost a son to SIDS when he was 4 months old. It is a very difficult experience to go through. You feel like you never get any answers to why a perfectly healthy baby just passes away in their sleep. That was 5 years ago and I am so thankful to have my 21 mo old son and 2 year old niece. From what I read, there really is nothing you can do to prevent a true SIDS. Boy babies are at a slightly higher risk and most cases occur around 2-4 months old. My heart goes out to anyone who this has happened to.

jessica.cagle311 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

The best way to prevent SIDS is to get an apnea monitor. Its seriously impossible for anything to happen if you have an apnea monitor. The babies face getting next to a blanket, bumper, or clothes is not what causes SIDS, that is technically suffocation because the baby is not yet strong enough to move there head away. SIDS happens when the baby inhales and for some unknown reason they forget to exhale. With the apnea monitor you can prevent SIDS because the alarm will alert you and all you have to do it go and wake the baby and the breath again. To prevent the baby from even having a chance of SIDS do not let them sleep for long periods of time. Yes the apnea monitor is somewhat expensive but it is the absolute best gift that you can buy for your baby.

kkostelnik |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My boy is 2 and a half months old and he WILL NOT sleep on his back for anything! even when he was first born he would only sleep on his side and now he wont even do that! He always rolls to his stomach. Obviously he's been fine so far but it does worry me, mainly because of all the SIDS hype. However he is able to move his head from side to side in order to breathe and moves around quite a bit in his sleep so I feel that he will be fine. I'm not sure what else I should do..

ashleynt09 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I am super scared of SIDS. My family has a genetic condition called Long QT Syndrome. It's not very common, but it has been blamed for many undiagnosed SIDS cases because it is a heart condition that can cause the heart to go into a-fib without warning and then cardiac arrest if the body cannot correct the problem. Two women in my family have already died from it and since we are having a girl (it runs in the females), I am scared to death that something could happen to her. But I guess the good thing about all this is knowledge. At least we are going into this knowing that this runs in our family and she will be tested immediately and probably monitored very closely.

gritcherd85 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I'm of the mindset that each parent should do their own research and come to their own conclusions on what is best for their family. To that end, I won't add my own personal opinion in but I have had the opportunity to be exposed to a professor who is widely considered the international expert on mother-baby sleep habits and have personally witnessed a number of videos and experiments mid-study. The research is very interesting and I highly recommend it when making your decisions: http://cosleeping.nd.edu/articles-and-presentations/articles-and-essays/ A Favorite article: http://cosleeping.nd.edu/assets/33678/mckenna_gettlerangxp.pdf

AmyandRyanND06 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I read that the fire-proofing chemicals the put on all mattresses are the gasses the baby breathes in when on belly/side and why its safer for him to be on his back. I plan on airing out that baby mattress for months! :s

gabyn29 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Get the SNUZA HALO if you're worried. It's pricey, but worth it. Check eBay maybe you can find it cheaper there.

Momof1pdabby |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Ok, I know everyone has their own opinion and will do what they think is best for their child. In all reality SIDS is unpreventable and researchers still do not know what causes it. Back in the 80's they said for babies to sleep on their stomachs for the same reason that they now say for babies to be on their backs. My older sister died at 2 months of SIDS in the 80's she was on her stomach like the research said it was safer. Just a couple years ago my friend's fifth child died of SIDS in her arms while they were napping in a chair. Nothing was over the baby's face. My mom knew a peds. doctor who's baby died in his arms in their care. So from this examples in my life I know that if it is going to happen it will and nothing is going to prevent it. I was afraid of it when my daughter was born but I did want she wanted. She slept on her stomach from the day we got home from the hospital because she did not like sleeping on her back and she is now 5 years old. Also, I don't know where you all live but where I do with every baby death they will do an autopsy. With SIDS though when the autopsy is preformed nothing is found wrong with the baby. No cause of death can be determined. If a baby dies from having a blanket over their face it is not SIDS it is suffocation and it will show in the autopsy. That is my opinion.

hannahsproudmomma06 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Why are some of you bashing others on here for having different views than yourself? and MANY of them have doctor approved lifestyles for their children. Dont tell people how to raise their children. Or that they are doing it wrong just because they aren't doing it the same as you. You'd FREAK OUT if some one else told you how to raise your child. Fact is, unless you are THAT parent in THAT family with THAT baby you ARE NOT capable of telling them they are parenting right or wrongfully. so get your emotions back in check please. I am an expectant mother and I will not vaccinate, I will breastfeed, and if my baby sleeps best on their back and doc says its ok, I will take all precautions and go that route. whats best for MY baby is whats best for them. And whats best for YOUR baby may be different. So dont try to act like they are all the same.

Shesaidwat |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Once your little one can roll over on their own, there's nothing you can do to prevent them from doing so during the night. My daughter is 6 1/2 months old and just started sleeping on her stomach, it's the only way she'll sleep through the night. (She tosses and turns a lot, and doesn't sleep flat on her face, she turns her head to the side and goes to sleep with a paci, though of course sometimes I have to put it back in during the night because sometimes she'll wake up and get fussy because it fell out) I've tried flipping her back over onto her back, but it doesn't do any good at all, she'll immediately flip right back onto her stomach. I discussed this with my doctor and he said himself that there's nothing you can do once that happens, even his daughter sleeps on her stomach and sometimes flat on her face. You can try to keep flipping them, but most likely neither of you will ever get any sleep. Which isn't good either.

TNE87 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I have heard so much about preventing SIDS...and I don't have a fabulous solution, but these are some things that I've done: Slept my baby on his back, with a fan going to aid circulation. Dressed him warm enough to not need blankets or wrapped him in an organic swaddler. The best info I've read about SIDS is through babesafe.com...a New Zealand study linking fire retardants in matresses to SIDS. I believe the information to be valid, and it's an interesting read. We wrapped my son's mattress in a Babe Safe mattress wrap, and I sleep better at night!

MaureenThiel |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Important information can be asertained from research; however, you must review all of the research you can to realize fact from fiction. You will not always agree, it is not necessary to agree, it is what it is. Keep in mind that should something happen to your child you WANT to KNOW that you did everything that you could to prevent it. In the end it is all up to the individuals, just be smart and take the time to properly understand these things that people are raving about, and do not blindly follow what they say; listen to the FACTS. From one Mother to all of you, be smart about your children, spend the time to understand, and do not be a hypocrite! You don't agree with somethings, and some people don't agree with you regardless of facts.

skyefl861 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Being a Moron has nothing to do with suffocating your child in bed with you! Cosleeping means the baby is in the same room not the same bad! My Parents are perfectly competent and NOT MONIC individuals, but one night my father was very tired and her accidently rolled ontop of me; my mother heard me struggling for breath and managed to wake my father; luckily i was not injured. So please do not say that only morons or dumb people can suffocate their children in the same bed; you do not know what you are doing while you are asleep; if my mother had not been awake i would not be alive, please do not keep your children in bed with you. By the way, i was in bed with my parents because my father was petrified of sids and felt that if i were in there bed he could make sure i continued to breath; intention does not always coinside with outcome.

skyefl861 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

*bed, *moronic, forgive my typoes i am quite tired currently; i suppoose i am being a hypocrite here since i just said that we all have different views and will not always agree; however the prospect of suffocating my own child is very terrifying so i felt compelled to share this story.

skyefl861 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I think their decision was premature. It's typical of lawmakers to legislate without having all the information. On that note, I do believe that traditional bumpers can pose a huge risk to those children who may be prone to SIDS. However, since we don't know which babies that might be at high risk, why are we taking that chance? There are many new breathable bumper solutions that can prevent the baby from re-breathing their own exhaled air. My favorite is manufactured by a company called Oliver B. They are offering what I believe to be the best product on the market. Take a minute and review their website: www.oliverbco.com. Be sure to look at all the articles that have been written about them.

cathyhansen14 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I like it when people "refuse to listen to every little thing the government says", but are happy to take the word of extremists who have their own biased information. The worst is that vaccinations cause autism- it's never been proven! Jenny McCarthy, the leader of this alarmist movement, claimed her son became autistic after receiving vaccinations, but it has recently come out that her son isn't even autistic! It is not only your child you put at risk by not vaccinating, but it's also the children around them who aren't old enough to be vaccinated.

Katie&Andy&Kitten |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I put my daughter to sleep in foot sleeper pajamas with a zipper. It fits well and isn't too loose, but is not too tight either. I have a few fleece ones that I will be using when the weather gets colder consistently, since my husband and I tend to keep our home cooler in the winter because my husbands get hot easily. It works well for her and she seems to sleep well. I also have to put mitts on her hands, because she scratches at her face when waking up and even though I trim her nails it doesn't make any difference!

swtpea18 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I got a lot of mixed advice when my daughter was born, I didn't think about SIDS until it struck close to home. Then I did research as questioned and got,even more mixed advice. Everyday I lay her on her back but since she learned to roll at 2 months she's been sleeping on her side. Sometimes she'll sleep on her tummy which is funny because her butt sticks up. She's strong and healthy. When I looked into all th vaccines I was shocked to learn that the vaccine is the virus plus the antivirus. When I asked her pedi why he said "she has to have it first in order to treat" what the hell. We switched pedis. Her new one said almost the same thing but explained it better. When she gets her shots. I don't sleep. I wasn't vaccinated regularly as a child, so I got sick a lot. I don't want the same for my little girl. To each their own though. Oh, my koala bear has a bed on our bed, it's a California king, and we're both small. Normally we take up less than half the bed, so her bed takes up the rest.

MiaQ1990 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My little guy is 6 months today. From about 3 weeks old he has been sleeping on his tummy. He would not sleep on his back no matter what I did. He wold fall asleep in my arms as soon as his back hit the mattress he was awake & crying. So after 3 sleepless weeks I tried his tummy. He promptly slept 6 straight hours. I admit to checking him a bunch of times but he was fine. He was able to pick p his head and hold it there from about 2 days old so I was not real worried. It just seems to vary from baby to baby. I told hes Dr at his 2 month check up that he was sleeping on his belly & that it was the only way he would sleep. Her response was to kind of quote the whole back is best, but agreed that he was very strong & able to lift & turn his head. She said if that was how he wanted to sleep then go with it just keep an eye/ear on him. He now from belly to back when he wakes up & plays till he is ready to be picked up. he can roll back to belly as well & practices that as play. As for blankets he sleeps in footed PJ's but stil likes a soft blanket when he sleeps. He kicks it away when he wakes up. So in the end he choose how he was gonna sleep & we went with it.

Jester131 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Great advice so far. Use common sense, and follow the baby sleep safety guidelines set by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

travllight |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

see, i tend to disagree about sleeping on the tummy... my daughter refused to sleep on her back at all and woke up every 5-10 minutes if we attempted to have her sleep on her back. and i'd rather have a bumper then to let her get her foot/feet stuck in the bars (which she has almost done) she's 10 months old and has done just fine with tummy sleeping and bumpers.

relientklover18 |

how-to-decrease-sids-risk

My baby boy Mikkel Esteban passed away on December 20, 2011 of SIDS. He was 7 months 3 days old. He was a healthy happy baby. He was reaching milestones earlier than expected. He was so sweet. I've been told there is nothing I or the babysitter could have done differently. There's no explanation for SIDS. My baby was well taken care of and loved very much. SIDS is very real, beware of decreasing risks but don't live in fear. Enjoy every moment with your baby. Mikkel brought us so much happiness. He was so handsome. We knew he would be a heartbreaker but we didn't know it would be so soon and it would be our hearts he'd break.

becMM2 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My little girl is a healthy four year old. She slept on her back with a pacifier, swaddle blanket, and nothing else in her crib. Now for my second I will do the same but will not be using any kind of standard bumper, I will be using Wonder Bumpers, a bumper alternative. So far during my research I found that this was the only bumper product that did not have any infant injury or SIDS repercussions. I wouldn't take any chances with the standard crib bumper or the breathable ones, they just don't seem safe to me. I would purchase Wonder Bumpers and follow the standard safety measures. New moms should just enjoy their babies and take care of them the best they can. I wouldn't stress out about SIDS. Kids grow up fast, have fun with them.

AMY0325 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I am a child care worker as well as a new mom...My baby is 3 weeks old...As working in childcare, in the state of IL, you have to take a SIDS training course...I can tell you keep everything out of the cribs, use blanket sleepers, put baby on their back...and binky's reduce the risk of SIDS (Do NOT put a binky clip/strap in crib with baby, JUST the binky) and ceiling fans reduces the risk of SIDS by 70%.

yarberj116 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

One thing that EVERY PARENT SHOULD KNOW about is wrapping their crib mattress with a Harlow's Earth Crib Mattress Cover. Studies show that chemicals in mattresses, particularly those added as a flame retardant, when mixed with naturally occuring molds within the mattress, a toxic nerve gas is created. Harlow's Earth Crib Mattress Covers act as a barrier to the chemical off-gassing that the mattress emits. Without this cover, gasses are released from the mattress and your baby is inhaling them while sleeping. Since public promoting mattress wrapping in New Zealand in 1996, there has not been a single SIDS death on a properly wrapped mattress. Check out the research on their website: HarlowsEarth.com

cassiehilton |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I love the way you write and share your niche! Very interesting and different! Keep it coming! Mahjong games

mic1122 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Every word in this piece of work is very clear and your passion for this topic shines. Please continue your work in this area and I hope to see more from you in the future. casino-virtuel

haree11 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

They would all give you a complete JumpBox running somewhere on the internet that acts just like the one you run on your personal machine,.... usb safe

tareelolo |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Thatis really nice to hear. thank you for the update and good luck,... usb safe

tareelolo |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

This tiny framegrabber hooks up to the DVI, VGA, or HDMI port of the graphics card, keylogger

tareelolo |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Hello, I have browsed most of your posts. This post is probably where I got the most useful information for my research. Thanks for posting, maybe we can see more on this. Are you aware of any other websites on this subject. jocuri cu masini

jonsan111 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Yes i am totally agreed with this article and i just want say that this article is very nice and very informative article.I will make sure to be reading your blog more. You made a good point but I can't help but wonder, what about the other side? !!!!!!THANKS!!!!!! online dating

troy55 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Hi everyone!! I find very interesting facts both pro and con co-sleeping, belly sleeping etc the only thing that bothered me a lot is the apparent confusion between SIDS and SUFFOCATION... they are two very different conditions... ALL DEATH (even adult ones) ultimately comes from a respiratory/cardiac failure but that doesn's mean that everyone dies of suffocation... the same can be said here... all the tips that avoid suffocation I think are extremely valuable as we wouldn't want to put our babies in harms way... that said... I do believe that SID is precisely what it states SUDDEN INFANT DEATH and it has now known cause... Thank you all for sharing stories and tips and viewpoints I am sure all of us who read the various posts will get many ideas to discuss w our care provider, parter and there is a lot of food for thought.... I really appreciate all the information provided! I am a first time mom and terrified of SID ... let's hope sometime they find the cause so we can have more definite do's and dont's!!

Rogaltab |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

Here's what I don't understand... if extra soft padding in your baby's crib (bumpers, pillows, blankets, toys, etc.) or bed-sharing may be to blame for SIDS, then why is SIDS such a mystery? Wouldn't it be be blatantly obvious if your child had entangled him/herself in a blanket or pressed him/herself into a bumper? You would find your little one still stuck in the item. I think it would be abundantly clear that the cause of death was suffocation, not some mystery condition no one can explain. There has got to be a better explanation for otherwise healthy infants to suddenly stop breathing. I hope the medical establishment will do some real studies and find some real answers for all of us concerned parents.

Babyabes |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I bought and Angelcare monitor.. NOW I CAN SLEEP!!! I was so sleep deprived because I kept listening to my lil angel sleep. Now, the monitor lets me know if baby is moving.. it is sensitive enough to tell if she is breathing. Bought it on Amazon.com. I read about 100 reviews... this is an AMAZING product!!!!!!! Im a first time mom and I am 40 so I thought maybe since I was older it would increase her risk of SIDS...

lilstarone@yahoo.com |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My LO is now 3 months old has been prone to spitting up and a few times we were lucky enough to have been in the same room when she started choking.. I know most will say that putting babies on their backs to sleep is the best way and I have tried with her, but she sleeps for longer durations when on her stomach. When placed on her back, she doesn't stay asleep for as long. Frankly, I'm afraid of her choking while on her back. Also, someone is usually with her when she's sleeping or I may sleep with her on her chest. I honestly cannot wait until she gets a bit older so that my worrisome self can calm down, LOL.

rika920 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My baby never got more than 30 mins of sleep at most on her back no matter what we did. At 4 weeks she preferred napping on her tummy so I let her with constant supervision but the only way either of us got any decent sleep was when I finally gave in and pulled her into bed with me, propped up on my arm, her on her side facing me. Anytime she fussed or wiggled I was awake immediately. It's created such a wonderful bond especially since we didn't get to breastfeed as long as I was hoping we would. SIDS can be caused by different things but I'm a firm believer in bed sharing as long as those sharing the bed aren't comatose when they sleep or toss and turn (parents). Having a sister who died from SIDS (and who was always put in her crib, on her back, uncovered, without anything but her in it) I can't help but link smoking and vaccines to the silent killer. I will say, I know thousands of babies get fully vaccinated without any immediate reactions but not all babies respond the same way to them and having a family history of reactions to vaccines are a major red flag as well.

Laa1015 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I have a question...is it nursing that helps decrease SIDS risk or breast milk? I'm exclusively pumping. Just curious about this one

blessing3 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

I don't know how to decrease the risk of SIDS but I know I feel better and sleep better knowing my daughter is sleeping comfortably. She is 9 weeks old now and I co sleep with my daughter in the same room and in the same bed, she starts out in her bassinet and some nights she she stays sleeping in her bed and some nights she makes her way into my bed, I have no fear of rolling on to her or anything like that because I have slept with her with me from the day she was born because I have a c-section and could hardly move. And due to her sleeping with/ on me she dose sleep on her stomach because that's what she likes and how she sleep best while in my bed, I believe that a parent should do what makes them feel comfortable, and if you truly have any major concerns ask your doctor they choose that field for a reason, and if they are a good dr. they will do what the can to ease your mind and give you advice

pmichael2030 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

The best thing you can do is get an Apnea test done before you leave the hospital. SIDS can be caused by Apnea and it could save you from the major scare I went through when I CAUGHT my son NOT breathing, I was lucky, he did not go blue, and he did not have blue lips he was just very pale and very still and unresponsive. It is the scariest thing I ever went through. Don't take the risk, get the test!

Darkcalisto |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My worst nightmare while going to sleep was waking up in the middle of the night and finding that my baby is not breathing. It's a terrifying thought, but the best thing you can do is create a safe sleep environment. Here is a good SIDS infographic resource that will show you how to do that: http://www.simplybabyfurniture.com/keeping-baby-safe-during-sleep.html

cmaddocks88 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

There are many categories of Cot Death. There is neonatal (deaths within 28 days of birth) SUDI (Sudden unexpected Death of a Infant) and SIDS (Suddeb Infant Death Syndrome) SUDI is when a baby has died from an infection, accident, or strangulation. SIDS is when no cause is found. There are lots of theories around the world and they sometimes contradict each other. This is the reason I have just written a book soon to be published early 2014 I am a mom and not an expert as such. This is not my main job. I have made it my mission to educate parents on all the facts and not leave anything out. This includes Is vaccination a risk factor. I have invented a product to prevent baby rolling onto their stomach as well. Look up Little Mites (Australia) for all details.

cameron212121 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

i think so my friend. Catering di Depok Catering di Bandung i hope i can use this sugestion all members for my self, thanks for sharing Jasa Catering di Depok Jasa Catering di Tangerang

gantengsekali |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

i think so my friend. Catering di Depok Catering di Bandung i hope i can use this sugestion all members for my self, thanks for sharing Jasa Catering di Depok Jasa Catering di Tangerang

gantengsekali |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

i think so my friend. Paket Pernikahan Catering di Bandung i hope i can use this sugestion all members for my self, thanks for sharing Jasa Catering di Jakarta selatan Catering di Tangerang

gantengsekali |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

My 6 mo. old died of SIDS. There is no explanation for it. We were very careful to prevent it? However, if experts can list several reasons as to how to decrease the odds of it happening....WHY NOT LISTEN? I've read several of the comments on this page. Everyone's a big talker saying how they do this or do that, and their babies are fine. Live through it once, and then see if you don't take safety suggestions.

njacobson0214 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

The seasons occur at Replica Watches uk the singing of the birds that spend. Singing these animals, for which the Replica Rolex uk enlightenment is passionate, between naturalism and coquetry, probably lulled the Breitling replica watches summers of the young prodigy at the edge of the Saut du Doubs waterfall. In these valleys which still today remain the cradle of Swiss watchmaking excellence, it is time to life in communion with the surrounding nature.

anthonyfiddy2 |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

i think so my friend. Yamaha R15 indonesia Cek Tagihan pln i hope i can use this sugestion all members for my self, thanks for sharing Menu Buka Puasa Cheat gta sand andreas PC Model baju lebaran

gantengsekali |

Q&A: How to decrease SIDS risk?

http://www.coachoutletstoreinuk.com Coach Factory Outlet http://www.coachfactoryoutletanus.com Coach Factory Outlet http://www.coachoutletonlineunsius.com Coach Outlet http://www.coachoutletonlinetur.com Coach Online Outlet http://www.coachfactoryoutletnbsa.com Coach Factory Outlet http://www.coachfactoryoutletuisa.com Coach Outlet Store http://www.coachoutletstorenie.com Coach Outlet Store http://www.coachfactorystoreuin.com Coach Outlet Online http://www.coachfactoryoutletreba.com Coach Factory Outlet http://www.coachfactoryoutletonlinesius.com Coach Factory Online http://www.coachoutletonlinetnse.com Coach Factory Outlet http://www.coachoutletnoia.com Coach Outlet Store Online http://www.chaneloutletinaus.com Chanel Handbags http://www.louisvuittonoutletina.com Louis Vuitton Outlet Online http://www.louisvuittonoutletine.com Louis Vuitton Outlet http://www.guccibeltsoutletbcus.com Louis Vuitton Belt http://www.guccibelststco.com Hermes Belt

disclosure |