Baby Symptoms & Conditions

Being a new parent means decoding a ton of baby symptoms, from a fever, to excessive crying to strange lumps and bumps. Is it a cold? The flu? Teething? Colic? Gas pain? The Bump is here to help! Try out our symptom finder to see what health conditions baby's symptoms could be signaling. And browse through a ton of articles on everything from baby allergies to yeast diaper rash. Find out what causes any common baby health condition, how to prevent it and how to treat it if baby gets it. We've got a ton of advice and tips from medical experts and from moms and dads who've been through it. So whether it's just a cold, or a sign of asthma, get the scoop on all baby and toddler symptoms and conditions right here at The Bump.

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Mouth Sores in Babies

What the heck are those weird sores on baby’s mouth? Here’s how to tell -- and what to do about them.

What are mouth sores in babies?

Occasionally, but not often, your baby may develop red or purple sores or a cluster of sores along his lips. Or he may have small, open (and sometimes painful) sores inside his lips, cheek, gums or tongue.

What could be causing my baby’s mouth sores?

Sores on the outer edge of the lips that are red or purple can be caused by the herpes simplex virus and can be passed onto baby through something as innocent as an infected relative’s gentle kiss. Sores inside the mouth, on the other hand, are considered canker sores, which can also be caused by a virus, stress or a trauma (like biting himself).

When should I take my baby to the doctor with mouth sores?

Typically mouth sores will go away on their own, but if a sore lasts more than a couple of weeks, or if he develops a fever or other symptoms like a rash or swollen lymph nodes, call your doctor.

What should I do to treat my baby’s mouth sores?

A pain reliever like acetaminophen can help reduce the inflammation, and you can try using an over-the-counter oral gel to provide some surface relief.

-- Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, FAAP, pediatrician with Seattle Children's Hospital, Everett Clinic

See More: Baby Basics , Baby Doctor Visits , Toddler Basics , Newborn Basics

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Reminder: Medical info on The Bump is FYI only and doesn't replace a visit to a medical professional.