Baby Care Basics:
5 Must-Know Tips for That First Week Home

1. Baby wipes
Most docs recommend avoiding premoistened diaper wipes for the first month of baby's life since some of their chemicals can irritate a newborn's tender skin. Instead, use cotton balls dipped in warm water. When baby’s ready for regular wipes, choose ones that are alcohol-free and unscented to prevent irritation.

2. Bath time
Until baby’s umbilical cord is off and healed, baby can only take sponge baths. Start by soaking your baby a little. Make sure to always keep one hand on baby, and remember that infants are especially slippery when wet. Start with his face–one area at a time since covering the whole face with a washcloth can be scary -- and work your way down. Make sure to thoroughly wash inside all the folds (under the arms, in the neck, the genital area, etc.) and save baby’s dirtiest parts -- aka the diaper area -- for last. Then, move back up and wash baby’s hair. And note: There’s no need to bathe more than every few days.

3. Newborn skin
At birth, baby's skin will probably appear to be dry. How come? It’s in the process of peeling off an entire waterproof layer of sorts. But in general, a baby's skin doesn’t need much specialized care -- just lots of TLC. A mild cleanser is safe, though many people recommend just plain water. Your baby's face takes a lot of abuse (just think of all that spitting!), so do your best to keep it clean. But if baby's skin seems excessively dry, irritated or itchy, or if you notice a rash or breakout, consult your pediatrician ASAP.

4. The umbilical cord get sucked into registering for cute toys or outfits Umbilical cord care has changed dramatically over the last 20 years; now, many hospitals recommend doing nothing but keeping the cord dry (read: sponge baths only). But some pediatricians still recommend using alcohol on the cord with each diaper change to speed up the healing process. That way you’ll be able to give your baby real baths, as opposed to sponge baths, sooner. So find out what your doctor recommends.

5. Fingernails and toenails
The safest way to keep a newborn’s nails short is to just file them and not cut them at all. Since the skin of the fingers is usually attached to the back of the nail, cutting the nails often results in nipping the fingertip too (ouch!). Even though the bleeding is minor and can be stopped quickly with a little pressure, it's very upsetting to the parent -- and always seems like a lot more blood than it really is! Once baby is a little older (18 months), you can cut their nails while they’re asleep.

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Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

How do I wean my baby off of a pacifier? When should I start?

Re: How do I wean my baby off of a pacifier? When should I start?

The Bump Expert

The weaning strategies are just about endless… as is the related controversy.
Some hard-line pediatricians say babies should give up the binky by age one, since by that time sucking is no longer an important source of soothing. Other doctors say not to stress because children naturally grow out of the paci between age two and four as they develop new coping mechanisms.  And most dentists advise cutting back on paci time by age two and eliminating it entirely by age 4, since too much sucking can lead to tooth problems.

One way to wean: Gradually and subtly, so your toddler barely notices the transition. Try first making a rule that he can only have the pacifier in your home or the car, not outside, then move on to only in his room, then only in the crib. (Do this over the course of weeks or even months. Patiently.) By the time you cut him off in the crib, his paci-dependence will have largely passed.

Or, you can tackle the issue quickly and directly.  Explain to your child that he’s a big kid now, it’s time to stop using the pacifier, and you’re going to take it away in a week. (Or five days, or three, or whatever works for you.) As the day draws closer, remind him that it’s almost time to give up the paci, and tell him that when he gives it up he’ll be able to go to the store and pick out a new toy. Play it right, and you might even find him kick the binky and head to the toy store before the deadline arrives.

Paula Kashtan

re: Q: Pacifier Weaning?

We started to only allow DD to have it at night or during naps. Then just during naps. Then fewer naps, and so on. I'm so glad we weaned her from it fairly early on (16 mos, approx) as her vocabulary SKYROCKETED after that point. She had so much to say and without the binkie it's easier to talk!

starshell |

re: Q: Pacifier Weaning?

As an educator with an M.Ed. in Child Development and a college level instructor in child development/early childhood education, I'm horrified by the advice here!  You can not tell an infant or toddler that they are a "big kid" now and it's time to give up the binky- they don't understand that!  Their object permanence skills are not yet fully developed and their concept of "gone" is very different from an adult's.  Second, they have no concept of time at that age much beyond five minutes (nor does a preschooler for that matter!), so telling them in five days means nothing to them- it could be five years, they don't understand the difference.  Lastly, bribing a child to do something may seem the easiest way, but it's not the most effective and there are few developmental experts that would tell a parent to brib a child.  Second, you are setting parents up for a nightmare- when at bedtime the child could care less about the toy and wants their binky back.  I really hope that parents are not taking this advice seriously.  Do some research and try again!

CarsRUs |

re: Q: Pacifier weaning?

I am preparing to begin this process as well. My friend recently did this on the advice of several other moms-Begin by limiting the paci to sleep time only.FOr one week try and take the paci for each morning nap, don't let him have it.The next week take it from both the morning and afternoon naps.The following week take it from the late afternoon nap(if your child takes one). And then finally take it away at night. It will take a mnonth but should ease the process. Everyone I have spoken with said it works AND is best done around 6 to 8 months. Hope this helps!

valleygirl77 |

re: Q: Pacifier weaning?

My aunt, when her son was almost two, went through all of the pacifiers in the house and cute the nipple off...so when he picked it up he said "oh boken" This worked very well with him..Not for everyone but it is an idea..I guess it depends on how attached your child is :-) GL

first-time-mama |

re: Q: Pacifier weaning?

My aunt, when her son was almost two, went through all of the pacifiers in the house and cut the nipple off...so when he picked it up he said "oh boken" This worked very well with him..Not for everyone but it is an idea..I guess it depends on how attached your child is :-) GL

first-time-mama |

re: Q: Pacifier weaning?

Sorry .. somehow I posted twice :-S

first-time-mama |

re: Q: Pacifier weaning?

I saw the most amazing thing at a toysRus. There was a little boy in line with his dad. The boy was holding a toy and a bag. When it was their turn, the little boy put the toy on the counter (he could just reach) and waited for the sales person to ring it up. Then, she said it would be such and such amount. The dad leaned over to the boy and said, "Okay, pay the lady for the toy." So, the boy opens the bag and empties out, like, 3 or 4 pacifiers and puts them on the counter for the sales person. The dad gave his son a thank you and good job, then paid for the toy with a card. The sales person, having caught on, took the pacifiers (I'm sure to toss them) and wrapped up the transation, giving the recipt and the toy to the little boy. A few more, I'm very proud of you's and they were on their way. I found myself a little proud of the boy too. What a unique way to do this.

Saiphyn |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My daughter was just turning 3 when I finally decided to have her give up the binkie and the big girl routine worked excellently for her. I didn't tell her when to give the binkie up. Instead I put a chart up on the fridge with two weeks worth of squares and told her that after two weeks without the binkie (starting whenever she chose) she and a friend could go to chuck e cheese. She IMMEDIATELY went and threw all of her binkies away which scared me cause I thought I'd be going to the store at 2 a.m. for another one! I had one stashed up on a high shelf for a week or so but she spied it one day while being carried and insisted we throw that one away too - as if we'd made a mistake and missed it the last time! She never asked for them again, filled in her chart every day & loved her chuck e cheese trip w/her cousin! By the end of two weeks the whole issue was over.

gemnap |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My oldest couldn't part with it. Finally when he was 3 I just threw them away. After a week of fussing, he's been clean since. My youngest just never took one. I would suggest NEVER giving your kid a pacifier.

adamalex0508 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My son is 4.5 months old right now. I had always said that he will be losing his pacifier at 6 months, and I mean it. I feel a little Nazi doing that to him, but I think it is better to take it away earlier before he develops that dependancy. I also have noticed that he has started to take the pacifier out of his mouth himself because he prefers his thumb (sometimes entire hand) instead. I am a school teacher so luckily he will be 6 months over Christmas vacation...I can only hope it goes well. =)

proud_mamí |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

Ignore the poster who claims that 1 and 2 year olds don't have object permanence: most research demonstrates they've grasped this by 6 months (and some studies show as early as 3.5 months).

At1stsight |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I need to jump in and correct the previous post. As an SLP I have never come across ANY research that states obj permanance is fully developed by 6 months. It comes in stages, and should be fully developed by 2 years old.

fraggs24 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

Since I am pregnant again, I am choosing not to use a pacifier after what I went through with my son. It took me 3 years after the recommended age to get him off of it. Turns out, since he lost it one day I said that it no more to my son. My son was almost 4-1/2 years old by the time I broke him of it. I will also say never trust anyone else to help you with weaning your kids off of pacifiers it just enables them and spoils them way too much. That's what I went through with my son

jstamand48067 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

Our 7 month old had a cold that made it difficult for her to breath through her nose. She couldn't suck on the soother because she needed her mouth to breath. She didn't fuss, and slept at night. So we just stopped giving them to her....2 months later and there's been no problems at all! Quick and easy...

Evasmile |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

Our LO will be 10 month this week. We decided before she was born that once she had teeth and started chewing on the soothers that it would be time to give them up. She was pretty good and only really wanted the soother at naps and bedtime or if in the carseat. I think it was more of a crutch for us because last week we decided to take it away at nap time and surprise surprise I though she would lose her mind, but she was awake for about 30 minutes the first nap then 10 minutes the second nap, but slept for the longest she has ever slept at nap time. I was going to give it to her for bed time but to my surprise she was tired enough and just went to sleep with out it, and again slept the whole night (usually she wakes up a couple times to potty). I now see that just taking it away was the best thing I could have done for her. It only took me one day to get rid of it and it hasnt come back. obviously the older we let them have it the more difficult it will be to get rid of it.

EnglishS |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I think everyone has their own opinion and just like each pregnancy is different, each child is different. Just because one child had a hard time breaking the binky habit doesn't mean the next will.

imkewlpup |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

i have a 7 month old and no way would i just start trying to take her paci away at this point! Don't get me wrong, I don't want to end up with a 2+ year old still using a paci but i think before age one it is too big of a stressor to the baby. I know of many children who just put it aside and never asked for it again. however, my DD already is starting to refuse it. I may just be lucky with that. Plus I don't want her to go to sucking a finger if I take it away too soon, you can take away a paci but not a finger

nje2008 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

This post is in reference to the replies that recommended never using a paci...I always thought I wouldn't give one so that my child 'wouldn't know what they were missing.' However, my older daughter never had a paci and became a thumb sucker instead. This was a nightmare...she was always sick and now her teeth and bite are paying the consequences. We tried EVERY method to get her to stop and she finally did at age 5. I wish she would have had a paci that we could have taken away...it would have been hard, but now we get to look forward to thousands of dollars at the orthodontist!:(

clm530 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My daughter is only 6 months and didnt like it until now. she doesnt need it but it helps when we want to keep her busy. would she still get attached to it? should i not use them any more?

Sp0325 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I'm speaking about myself as a child. I had a pacifier until I was almost 6 years old. My parents said I couldn't start school (we didn't have kindergarden in school where I lived) until I threw away the paci. I remember my parents taking away the paci when I was younger, but the back seat of car paid the price. Any available spot on the seat had teeth marks on it. I was like a dog, I chewed anything plastic. Didn't eat it, just liked putting little teeth marks in it. My parent gave back the paci so I could chew it (since kids shouldn't chew gum because of choking risks). Just realize that the pacifier has more uses than just kids sucking on them. After throwing away the paci, I became a nail biter, until I had braces in high school.

coolaerogirl |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I've been told by a dentist that extended use of the paci can in fact damage the way your little one's teeth grow...the suggestion was (once they start getting teeth) to take all of them & cut the nipples off...give them the paci when they ask for it & when they realize it has no nipple they will not put it together in their minds that it was you that wrecked it. I plan on trying that & hopefully it works so I don't have to feel like a bully to my own baby by taking away a comfort item.

crae18 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

i work for an orthodontist and there is no permanent damage to the teeth with using a paci until the age of 3. I would suggest that your child is ready to give it up because if they move to the thumb it is alot harder to stop that, can't take it away. With my son he only used his paci at night and sleeping and at 2 and a half I told him that santa sent him a letter and it said that he would send him 1 early christmas present, if my son sent him his paci. so we went to the post office and picked out a envelope and sent it to santa, the next day he got a toy in the mail from santa. He asked for it once and I told him remember we sent it to santa, and he said oh yeah. He never asked for it again. But I think the child has to be ready especially if they are older because it can be tramatic for them and they could switch to the thumb.

amymichetti |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My grandmother told my mom that if kids are going to suck then they'll find a way to do it and it's way easier to "lose" a soother than to cut off a thumb. Great advice in my opinion and I fully intend to follow it. I know my soother went "missing" right after my little sister was born at age 2. and according to my mother i fussed for a bit and then just forgot about it

laurynfaerie |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My son gave his pacifier up at 2 months old. One day he just refused to take it and that was it. Almost everyone in my family got rid of their binkies on their own, all at different ages of course. None of us had it pass the age of 3, but most of us chucked it long before then. It is said this is the best way to get rid of it; by letting the child decide when. As long as you are not making a big deal about them having it neither will they and in less time than you think, they will feel no need to have it.

JBunting3 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My daughter was completely weened of the paci at 4 months, she didn't even notice it was gone. We left her at grandmas for the night and somehow she was given a nook, now she flips when ever she doesn't have one at 9 months old. :(

nicoleklein |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

A friend of mine gave me GREAT advice on how to wean from a pacifier. She tied the pacifier to a stuffed animal and slowly the child was allowed the pacifier/stuffed animal less and less throughout the day. This proved to be rather simple because the child wanted to use both of his hands and was unable to hold the stuffed animal in order to suck the pacifier. Eventually he was only allowed to have the stuffed animal/pacifier at night. Then one night the pacifier was gone. She explained to him that another child needed it and that the pacifier fairy came and got it so she could bring it to some other little boy. After some consideration, he came around and was soothed simply by the stuffed animal that he had come to love. Worked like a charm for her and then also her brother. :)

jackiejnelson |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

my son had his nuk until he turned 3, we took the slow approach to weaning, only at naps and bed then only to bed at night over several months, then I told him it was time to get rid of it as he is a big boy now and over about 2weeks kept telling him that and finally said ok this is the last night and threw it away the next day. He did ask for it that night and whined for about 5 minutes, but then that was it, he asked for it maybe twice after that and it has been about 5 weeks and he is great and has no desire for it. EVERY child is different as are the parents. Do what feels right for you and your little one, there is no set right or wrong when it comes to your own child :)

floridagirl74 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

i work for a pediatric dentist. her best advice to parents are to wean your child from the pacifier by age one. the reason for this is simply that their will be damage to the growth pattern to the teeth. the permanent teeth will then be crowded as well and the child will be headed down the road for a few years in braces!! she recommends to just pick a weekend and throw them away or tell them that a newborn needs them now.

pretygirl59 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

much easier said than done to wean them from the pacifier. I took all of the extra ones in the house except for one. I told my daughter once that one was lost or gone, no more , I stuck to it and she gave it up. But there were a few nights of whining getting used to it.

Toddler101 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

took it away at 1 years old w/ no issues w/ my older 2 kids.

midnightjo |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

With me, my paci was lost for one nap time. My mom walked with me all over the house looking for it, then said, why don't we try napping this time without it, and I'll look for it while you nap. I never even asked for it again. (But I was vocal early on and able to have relatively intelligible conversations and understand the agreement). But possibly the idea of "losing" the paci or just trying one naptime without it might help. For what it's worth.

baleydyan |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I was a binki baby and my parents got me to throw mine out but as soon as the cheers ended I went into the trash for it. So they waited a few more months and tried again. This time I didn't go back for it but I went for my thumb instead. I ended up getting a form of a retainer put in when I was in 1st grade and I told the dentist at one check up that I still wanted to suck my thumb so I wanted to keep the retainer. I had it for about a year before I was able to kick the habit and I never had to have braces. So, no mater how much one wants a child to relinquish their binki I don't think it will happen unless they are ready. (I also didn't give up my security blanket until some point in college. It moved from the clutches of my hands at all times, to bedtime only, to in my pillow case, to in my nightstand, before I trashed the ball of strings that remained) My DH was a paci baby too so it didn't suprise us when our DD was born wanting a paci. She is now 7 months old and I am proud that she can now locate and put the paci in her mouth all on her own at night. I think it will take some time for us to get it from her but I know it will happen when she is ready even if it is little by little. Good luck to everyone with weaning the paci or a security blanket/anything.

chicklit828 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My sister's doctor suggested cutting off the rubber part of the paci, and then giving it to my nephew. My sister did this and my nephew gave the paci back to her, he didn't want it since there was nothing to suck on. It didn't even take a day before he had given up the paci completely.

stacirae |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

my girls paid for toys with theirs. they were well past 3, so it was time. they had them only at bedtime from about 2 on. My girls were preemies and had a rough start. One only had a paci for the first 2 weeks of her life (no milk), so she was extra attached. I wasn't in a rush. One was ok that night and never asked again, the other was sad for a week. Seeing how sad she was made me want to get that darn paci back, but i held out and she forgot about it after a few nights. Their dentist was more open about it than some dentist are, I think. She said she didn't see any issues in the shape of their mouths so I wasn't worried. She actually told me, "they probably won't go to kindergarten with it, so don't worry."

greatfindsamy |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I took my daughters binki away at 6 months she doesnt need it. I didnt want her to have it at all when she was born but we didnt to sooth her...I have of little cousins and I may not know much but 3 of them had there binkis and bottles til after they were 2 and have problems with teeth. The dentist sadi it was from them, Im sorry take the darn thing a way listen to the screams fora few nights and let it be done. its better to do it early

BabyCakes1089 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

start slowly by putting it away while baby is asleep. I am very lucky i intraduce it to her @ 3 mos and at 9 months she spits it out. she will chew on it but not suck on it like it shiould be. it takes lots of patience or get a shield for the finger at ONESTEPAHEAD.COM they have lots of neat baby stuff.

nettatc |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My son is 7 months old. We took away his pack night before last. Yesterday he fussed because we wouldn't give it to him. But today he went right to sleep without it. I would rather get this part over with then wait until he is older.

afumeo |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I haven't read all of the posts, so maybe I missed it, but am I the only one who understood that giving a pacifier at bedtime and naps is recommended to lower SIDS risk, just like putting baby on her back, no blankets, running a ceiling fan, etc.? My LO is about to be 1 year and has never been that dependent on the pacifier, but still gets it for sleep time for this reason only. She actually won't take it any other time, but it's now one of her sleep cues. I will probably take it soon and exchange it for a small stuffed animal or other object she can sleep with instead, since I think she just wants it for comfort out of habit now. I can't be the only new mom who was told about pacis and SID prevention, though!

vugirl |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I think it all has to be when your ready. When I was ready to wean mine off of hers everyone told me "be ready for a lot of screaming and sleepless nights again", but it wasnt like that at all and she was VERY attached to hers. I just took it away one day and hid it. I kept a spare for about 3 days (just in case) and then threw them away. Then the next week did the same with her bottle another success! :)

CierraN21 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

i started 3 months after her 1st birthday. I cut the top of the pacifier and as my daughter began to suck on it she notice that something was different. then eventually she threw it away.

TIFPINK |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My baby is only 5 months & the dr said no more paci :(( but she loves it & I have seen many kids at age 1 or older with pacifiers so I'm not taking it away just yet...

cindyibarra |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My baby just turned 5 months old and it was absolutely easy to stop the pacifier. We just took it away one day and he completely forgot about it. He was a little fussy during the afternoon, but nothing too hard to deal with. We were scared because his cousin is 3 1/2 with a pacifier still and is completely addicted. They have tried stopping it so many times without success... so we didn't want the same problem

haydenbmw |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

A lot of these answers make me wonder about the parenting going on in the world. When a child is ready to give up a pacifier they will. It is not healthy for a child to be told they can't have the pacifier anymore or have it taken away. These twisted people who "take the pacifier" are going to end up with children that have issues with security because their parents didn't bother to learn a thing about caring for a kid.

mrsjune25th |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I do not agree, my niece was five and has messed up teeth because of it, you are called "parents" for a reason otherwise you would be called buddy! The pacifier is for the stage in life that is soothed by sucking, that is why babies put everything in their mouth but at some point they need to mature, and there is nothing wrong with coaching and teaching your children other coping mechanisms to calm and sooth themselves, it is when you don't that they have issues later in life, for example I know of a man that still to this day sucks his thumb because he was never taught how to deal other ways! That is what is twisted!

medicgirlie37 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

Binky fairy!!!! My sister was almost 3 and wouldnt give up her binky. So I told her if she put it under her pillow the binky fairy would leave her a prize. So we did that for for a few nights and she was binky free and happy with new prizes !

samgps |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I was a thumb-sucker... Like, a CHRONIC thumb-sucker. I was almost nine before I quit, and only b/c my teeth were so terrible that my mom had to take me to the orthodontist to get a gate-like device put in my mouth that literally stopped me from putting my thumb all the way in my mouth. I knew since I was a child that when I had kids, it'd be pro-pacifier because you can take them away! My & my husband's now-15 month old son uses pacifiers and now that his pediatrician recommended we start weaning him off of it, we're going to try limiting him to nap times & bedtime only. Even now, he's fine without it during the day; it's become like an afterthought. I'm proud to be a binkie mom! I don't think I could do what my mom did!!

snapcrakklepop |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I started weaning early, around 4 months, when my LO discovered she could put her fingers and thumbs in her mouth resulting in sleep. I began by taking it away during the day and allowing her to discover her own self soothing techniques. This quickly lead to taking it away at night as well. I would say it took about three weeks to a month before it was completely gone.

GoldenAura6 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I think that babies only really need them to sleep. Do they really need to have a binkie hanging out of their mouth all day while they are playing? Its really to soothe them and help them sleep. So I plan on only giving my DD her binkie for sleeping and thats it. My mom has given me some advice on it as well. She suggests pulling it out of their mouth after they are sleeping they they learn to sleep without it. Use it only to help them fall asleep. It will save you a couple of trips to the nursery every night to find it and give it back to them.

beanermikey |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My daughter was obsessed with her pacifier at 7 months. She would wake up several times a night and that was all that she wanted. So, one night, we just took it away, and instead gave her a stuffed animal to sleep with. It was a giraffe that had soft ears on it. She would take the giraffe and chew on the ears and was fine within a couple days!

ShaynaLily |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

Our DS turned 3 and we had our first dentist visit. The dentist showed me how his bite was not connecting at all on one side! That day we talked about the pacifier going so that his teeth and mouth would feel better. After 2 weeks he still wakes up whimpering and searching for the pacifier. We tried the binky fairy, loading him up with soft blankets and stuffed toys, but nothing has worked. We are exhausted, but we are not going back. I had braces for four years and if I can steer him from the same pain in exchange for a few sleepless nights I will. Good luck to all the families out there. I always tell people that my DS is the most challenging boss I have ever had :)

cyndiathma |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

My son held on to his binky like it was a lifeline! We actually started out by only giving it to him during naps and when he was real fussy, but as time went on, he seemed to want it more (it went from a suckle need, to a want). My mom found the bye bye binky method ( www.bye-bye-binky.com ), printed it and suggested that we go with it. At first I was a bit mad at my mom, but I soon got over it. The method worked amazingly well. My son stopped sucking on it after 4 days! He proceeded to carry it around for another week, but never put it in his mouth. He then got tired of carrying it and simply lost interest. Mom was right, it worked, highly recommended!

HappyAmber2 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

We didn't want our daughter to have one at all and we expressed this to the nurses at the hospital when she was born, but apparently someone didn't get the memo because they gave her one anyway, so we decided that as soon as she cut her first tooth we would take it away. We didn't even have to wait that long, by about 3 months old she decided she didn't want it anymore and every time we put it in her mouth she would spit it out.

CatC86 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I have two answers. The way I did it was on a vacation because my pediatrician mentioned to do it what things are not routine..He cried for a little bit one night and that was it..amazing. and then the other way was when I was asked to call up my friend's daughter and act like a fairy princess. I told her how proud I was of all her growing up. I thanked her for giving me her pacifiers so I can give it to all the other little girls...I thought that was such a nice touch and wished I would have done something that sweet for my boys...

sooze253 |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

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gantengsekali |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

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gantengsekali |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

I agree with educator with an M.Ed. in Child Development and a college level instructor in child development/early childhood education, CarsRUs. I just wish the person who posted would have offered some alternative resolutions for people who are in this predicament. I am nursing my 3 month old and 5th child. I did not have any of the challenges with weaning off the pacifier with any of my previous children because none of them used it past 5 months of age. I'm not saying I'm a better mom than anyone, by any stretch of the imagination... just perhaps consider not letting the LO use the thing quite so long to begin with... especially after the teeth come in... (?)

JewlTonz |

Q&A: Pacifier weaning?

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