Baby Care Basics:
5 Must-Know Tips for That First Week Home

1. Baby wipes
Most docs recommend avoiding premoistened diaper wipes for the first month of baby's life since some of their chemicals can irritate a newborn's tender skin. Instead, use cotton balls dipped in warm water. When baby’s ready for regular wipes, choose ones that are alcohol-free and unscented to prevent irritation.

2. Bath time
Until baby’s umbilical cord is off and healed, baby can only take sponge baths. Start by soaking your baby a little. Make sure to always keep one hand on baby, and remember that infants are especially slippery when wet. Start with his face–one area at a time since covering the whole face with a washcloth can be scary -- and work your way down. Make sure to thoroughly wash inside all the folds (under the arms, in the neck, the genital area, etc.) and save baby’s dirtiest parts -- aka the diaper area -- for last. Then, move back up and wash baby’s hair. And note: There’s no need to bathe more than every few days.

3. Newborn skin
At birth, baby's skin will probably appear to be dry. How come? It’s in the process of peeling off an entire waterproof layer of sorts. But in general, a baby's skin doesn’t need much specialized care -- just lots of TLC. A mild cleanser is safe, though many people recommend just plain water. Your baby's face takes a lot of abuse (just think of all that spitting!), so do your best to keep it clean. But if baby's skin seems excessively dry, irritated or itchy, or if you notice a rash or breakout, consult your pediatrician ASAP.

4. The umbilical cord get sucked into registering for cute toys or outfits Umbilical cord care has changed dramatically over the last 20 years; now, many hospitals recommend doing nothing but keeping the cord dry (read: sponge baths only). But some pediatricians still recommend using alcohol on the cord with each diaper change to speed up the healing process. That way you’ll be able to give your baby real baths, as opposed to sponge baths, sooner. So find out what your doctor recommends.

5. Fingernails and toenails
The safest way to keep a newborn’s nails short is to just file them and not cut them at all. Since the skin of the fingers is usually attached to the back of the nail, cutting the nails often results in nipping the fingertip too (ouch!). Even though the bleeding is minor and can be stopped quickly with a little pressure, it's very upsetting to the parent -- and always seems like a lot more blood than it really is! Once baby is a little older (18 months), you can cut their nails while they’re asleep.

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How Do I Sleep Train?

We all need to get more sleep at night! How exactly do we go about sleep training?

Re:

We all need to get more sleep at night! How exactly do we go about sleep training?

The Bump Expert

Sleep training just means giving baby a gentle push to fall asleep in her crib independently. Baby wakes naturally throughout the night and if she needs you to rock, feed, shush or bounce her to go back to sleep, she’s going to keep waking you up to do that. The idea is to get her not to need that any more. How you get to that point is up to you. A few (of many) methods:

Go with the flow. Jodi Mindell, the associate director of the Sleep Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, says the quick-and-dirty approach is to put baby to bed while he is still awake but tired and then check on him periodically. Check as frequently as you wish -- there's no magic number of how long to wait -- but don’t do your usual rocking, feeding, shushing or bouncing. Within three to five nights, you're bound to see a dramatic improvement in the bedtime routine.

Be consistent. The thing that’s hardest for some parents is baby’s resistance. Baby may shed some tears about the change, but in order for the training to work, you may have to let her cry a little. When you check on baby, it's better do it consistently, rather than waiting until she really cranks up the tears. If you wait until then, you're showing her that if she screams really loud, you'll come. When you check in, just reassure her quietly and then leave -- "It's night-night time. I love you. See you in the morning." We’re not saying you need to leave baby alone all night -- it's too painful for everyone, and you’d worry about baby too much.

Use a timer. Richard Ferber, MD, associated with the “Ferberization” method of sleep training, advocates a similar but slightly stricter approach. After you put baby to bed, leave the room. Return at different intervals -- 5, 10 and 20 minutes, even if baby is crying -- making him wait longer each night.

Hover at bedtime. Need a slower method? For three nights, sit next to the crib until your baby falls asleep, then do three nights across the room, then in the doorway, and then in the hallway. The methods bring you to the same place; it's just about how quickly you want to do it.

Of course, what works for every baby is different. Here’s how a few Bumpies sleep trained:

“We did a graduated method of ‘cry it out’ where we checked on the baby every five to 10 minutes around eight months, and that seemed to work. He's 21 months now and sleeps through the night consistently. He still doesn't really like going to bed though.” -- Maebb

“We did Ferber's method (going in at intervals to comfort) from his book Solve Your Child's Sleep Problems for naps at 4.5 months. I did straight ‘cry it out’ at night at 6.5 months. Both were relatively painless without hours of crying, and I would do it again.” -- Flip-flops

“We did sleep training, but we always just let him lead the way. He would wake up often in the night, and we would feed him if we couldn't get him back to sleep by just comforting him. At four months he learned to roll to his stomach, and once he started preferring to sleep on his tummy, he slept much better. We slowly started pushing his nighttime feeding back longer and longer until he was consistently making it until 5 a.m.” -- Linzee

Expert: Jodi Mindell, PhD, is the associate director of the Sleep Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Anisa Arsenault

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I have been using the "Baby Whisperer" method, which is basically to put the baby down when they are not fussing nor are they sleeping. If they get upset then you pick them up and comfort them but again put them back down before they fall asleep. The other thing is to not nurse them to get them to go to sleep. We have twins - one goes to bed amazingly well on her own every time, and the other is getting there. It's nice to put them down when they're tired and they put themselves to sleep!

kdhudon |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

We have tried nearly every method out there and our baby just will not go to sleep on his own. If he does manage to fall asleep after crying for at least 45 minutes, (we check on him frequently and talk to him quietly, sing his favorite songs, sshh, etc.) he will still only sleep for about 2 hours and then the entire process has to be started over. We have been doing the same bedtime routine starting at roughly the same time for over 14 days now, really no progress....any suggestions?

kalli.k@hotmail.com |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

How old is your baby? normally they start sleeping through the night at 3-6 months. I know its frustrating but it just takes time. Youll get there.

Taterbutt |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My lil man is 7 months and refuses to go to bed without being held and drinking a bottle. Once he's done drinking his bottle, he's either fully asleep or just about there and I put him in his crib and he's good to go. I don't want to teach him that a bottle in bed is ok so that's why I hold him while he drinks (our bedtime cuddle time). He still wakes up at least twice in the night for a bottle and I'm at my wits end on it. I talked to his new doctor's PA and she told me it's more of him wanting the sucking action and his mommy holding him. She told me to gradually decrease the amount of formula I give him each time. I started that and so far it's working some. He had a few nights of screaming at the top of his lungs and crying cause it wasn't enough, then after a few nights, he slept through the night, then he woke up one the following night and on the 4th night he whined a lil twice in the night and cried a lil but only for about 5 min and fell back to sleep. I will be going back to work in the next week. I pray by then he's sleeping at least 8 hours through the night and is ok without his middle of the night bottle. I'm a single mom and it's emotionally and physically taking a toll on me and its time to get my life back and put things in order.

jacksonla |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My daughter just started sleeping about 6 out of 7 nights - three weeks ago - from about 9PM-5:30AM. She just turned 8M yesterday. I've been working full time since she was a few weeks old with my husband out of town most of the time - so believe me, I know how you feel. We did just move into a new house so that may be part of it - but I've also got her on a good routine - we play pretty hard right up until 8PM with her crawling and standing - then a quick bath - I nurse her for some loving and until she's in a sleepy state - then lay her down - about 50% of the time she goes right to sleep - the rest of the time she either gets upset, standing and screaming in the crib, so I'll pick her up and give it another go for another five min OR she whines a little rubbing her eyes, then conks out.***I also dress her in something light and cool and keep a fan running in room to block out sound.

meganpaye@hotmail.com |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Megan, I still do the snuggle and bottle right before bed but once he's in bed, that's it. He's woken up a few times thru the night, cried, played and fussed. I've finally learned myself to just ignore it and leave him be and it worked. I had to train myself that he's already been fed and can wait til the morning, he's had a bath and he's dry enough. So far, it's working for us both. The other night it was almost 10 and he didn't want to sleep but play. He wanted me to hold him to but then he''s starting to be mean to me like smack me hard in the face, squeeze and scratch my mouth and chest. I finally got fed up with that during our snuggle time, put him in his crib and walked out the room. I just bathed and fed him so I just turned the baby monitor on and relaxed in the living room. It was so cute when I went in after I knew he was asleep. He was curled up with his arm around part of the crib bumper holding it like a blanket or pillow. It was a good night after that. I leave my tv on with the volume very low for noise. I've done that since he was born, we're not fan people.

jacksonla |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

We just started sleep training and our son just turned 8mo. I read about all the methods and we decided to try the Ferber method first. We started by playing in his room and in his crib during the day to make it a comfy place to be then put him down when he was tired but not totally asleep. He cried for 13 min the first night, then 48 min the 2nd night, which was painful to listen to, but after that he's been pretty good! I was amazed. We have a night here or there where he wakes up in the middle of the night but we think its working.

kmallik |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I've been reading The No Cry Sleep Solution and love it. Our 6 month old has always been a good sleeper but had a very late bed time. We wanted her to get more sleep so we've been putting her to bed earlier using the routines and methods described in the book. I think it works great and there really is no crying!!

KristyS17 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Baby just turned 7mo yesterday and 3 nights ago we started sleep training. Up until now he has slept in bed with us. That is no fun! I suggest reading "The Sleep Easy Solution". Having a consistent routine is key for our LO. Me, Dad, Grandma, any one who will be putting baby to sleep has to do the exact same thing, every single time.

newmomnicole |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I know its not the best solution, but my husband and I both work and we need sleep. We put our 7 month old boy to bed with us until he falls asleep, then we move him into his crib. Sometimes he wakes up after 4 hours or so and we'll put him back into bed with us, other times he sleeps the night. I think it reassures him that even when he's in the crib, he can still get back to mommy and daddy if he's upset. We're hoping eventually, he'll sleep all the time through the night in his crib and not need to come back with us.

Skyblueday32 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My baby girl is 7 months old. I'm trying to see if she can fall asleep at 9 and stay sleeping until the next day and it don't work. Ever since she was a new born she slept all night but wakes up at 4 or 5 in the morning to like drink milk. So now that shes 7 months she is doing that again. She falls sleep at 11:30pm n she wakes up at 5 or 6 in the morning goes back to sleep and wakes up at 7 or 8 in the morning. She takes her little naps but when it time for bed she just want to play and laugh but she don't want to sleep. So i don't know what do to have any of you had or have this problem. Can you tell me what should I do?

nnunez28 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My baby girl will be 7 months this weekend. She sleeps through the night, with the occasional rough teething night, but getting her down can be a challenge. I've never just put her in her crib, she's always been asleep when I put her down. When is a good time to start a more interactive bedtime routine, like reading a book... right now she's totally disinterested in reading (only wants to eat the books!), so I'm not sure when it would be effective... she has a last bottle before bed, but doesn't ever go to bed with a bottle... occasionally the paci before she spits it out... I guess I'm interested to know how to make bedtime easier? Once she's asleep, she's out for at least 8 hours, but getting her there can be difficult some nights and I just don't know how to make it easier...

jmagnus726 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I've read that an earlier bedtime is a big factor for how long they will sleep. When I started putting my 7 month old to bed at 7, he started sleeping way better. If they stay up too late then they get over tired and don't sleep well. He is 8 months now and sleeps from 7 till 8 the next morning with one nighttime nursing. It also is extremely important to put them in bed awake. Trust me, if you don't you'll be rocking a toddler to sleep every night because they never learn to self soothe.

lvtaylr |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My little man is 7 months and he just wants to be put in his crib ,,,, :( I miss rocking him. when I put him in the crib I hold his bottle for him and within 5-10 min he is asleep .. he is such a good boy.

Tlongwith |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My 7 month old started sleeping 8-10 hours a night when he was about 2 months old. We didnt even have to try to get him to sleep he just did, but that only lasted for about 3 weeks. He's been teething since he was about 3 months old and now has 6 teeth so he has basically been teething for 4 months. I get him sleepy after playing, taking a bath and having a bottle and he falls asleep on his own in his crib but then he will wake up every two hours for the rest of the night. Most of the time all I have to do is give him his pacifier and roll him over and he will fall right back to sleep. We tried the Ferber "cry it out" method and it seemed to get better after about a week, but then he got worse and I couldn't keep doing it. Is it just his teeth bothering him or is he too attached to wanting to come to bed with us?? Any suggestions?

stefftrosko |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

We made ourselves wait 5 minutes. Put him down, if he's still crying in 5 minutes, give him a pacifier calm him down (but only for a minute) and then leave. Repeat until he's asleep. For middle of the night wake-ups, we again waited 5minutes before even getting out of bed. We also decreased the amount of breastmilk/formula he was getting during the night every week. Within 3 weeks, he was going down with out a problem and was no longer waking up to feed. If he did wake up, he put himself back to sleep long before the 5 minute mark. The only thing is, you'll need a clock. Waiting 5 minutes when you're baby is crying seems like eternity, but be strong. You're not hurting him.

lhills1 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Babies don't develop really good sleep habits until they are about 2. Some take longer. Babies sleep cycles are about one hour (ours are a a few hours). So babies are prone to waking up frequently. For this reason, I have found it easier to bring baby to bed in the middle of the night. We follow a night time routine of bath, pajamas, book and them I nurse her to sleep and put her in her crib. When she wakes I bring her to bed. I don't understand "sleep training". What are you teaching baby? I want my LO to know that night time is not scary and dies not mean alone time. Sleeping should be relaxing. Dr Sears has a lot in his books and online. Also some good stuff about infant sleep here. http://www.drmomma.org/#uds-search-results There are some long nights mow, but baby will thank you later for giving the love and cuddles s/he needs.

MamaMarge8 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Babies need to learn to sleep in their cribs during their naps so they will sleep there at night. I have 8 month old twins who have been sleeping in their cribs (separately) since about 3.5 mos. Before that they slept together in a co-sleeper. You need to put them down when they are awake so they can learn to fall asleep on their own. Look for their sleep cues i.e yawning, rubbing eyes, etc. Mine two little ones still take 2 to 3 naps a day. I think when you have two you have no choice but use this method, there is no possible way I could rock them both to sleep each time!! If you have fallen into bad habits it will take some time to break them but it will be worth it in the end, who wants a toddler in bed with them!

jennysmith311 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Believe me, we had tried everything to get our daughter to sleep through night. What finally worked (the second time we tried it) was the cry it out method. I took her to the doctor to make sure there was nothing wrong, (ears, teeth, etc) and just went for it. That was 2 weeks ago, and while she still cries when we out her down, its for a lot less time that the first night. (2 1/2 hours, yikes!) Now its down to about 15 min on average. She is just very strong willed, and fights her sleep. Prior to the sleep training, she was getting up MANY times a night, sometimes just an hour after we put her down and wanted a bottle to soothe her. After 4 nights, we weaned her off her night feeding too. If she wakes up, she usually cries for a few minutes and goes right back to sleep. She is sleeping between 9-11 hours a night. I know the crying is torturous, but when you are at your wits end, it really is the way to go. Our daughter knows we love her, and she gets plenty of love, snuggles, reassurance, and attention when she is awake. Set a plan, a routine, a bed time, and go for it!!

Soon2bMrsJSM |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Soon2bMrsJSM, we have a 3month old and i'm just having a hard time letting go and hearing that cry that goes on - it seems like forever. my husband and I argue about it coz he wants her to learn to sleep on her own and have her cry it out. it's so hard to listen to that poor baby cry. i guess after reading to the responses, i'll try and hold out.

jg3154 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

OMG I need help Please someone help me! I have a 7 month old. He will only fall asleep with me. Then we put him in his crib and he sleep all night long. But then he got his first ear ache 20 days ago and he will not go in his crib what so ever. I put him in his crib when he is fully asleep and he instantly wakes up crying. I have done the soothing method where I am in the room and sing to him rub his head. Everything to calm him down. I have just let him cry it out. He crys and crys until he throws up rather I am in the room or not. So he has been sleeping in our room. I have made him a bed on the floor which sounds mean but its a couch and its comfy. I have really bad anxity so I have a huge fear of him choking to death even though my Doctor said it is very unlikely. But this is consumming me and my husband can anyone help me please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I am so desprate that I have never wrote on here before but you can email me at buchholztiffany@hotmail.com to help me out. Anyadvise would help.

tiffy1528 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Oh sweetie I am so sorry! Hang in there. We had a lot of success with the first 2 boys with Jodi Mindell's techniques (Sleeping Through the Night). This time we tried No Cry Sleep Solution and weren't making progress so we are back to Mindell. It is not fun but EVERYTHING gets better when they start sleeping through the night. Pick your approach carefully and prepare, then go for it. Hugs.

thankfulmama |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I used the Ferber (did I spell that right?) method for child 1 (now 2.5). Worked really well. But now I have baby #2 at 7 months and we're dying to cry him out, BUT, they share a room...I can't just let him fuss until he gets himself back to sleep bc then he wakes up my other child. Any suggestions?

Dozerzmom |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I tried the cry it out method but it seemed sooo unnatural. I couldn't stand listening to himself get frantic and upset every night. He cries because he is scared and in need of comfort and reassurance. I don't want him growing up later in life with trust issues because I thought he would be spoiled at 7 months. Kudos to the moms who can do it and have to do it.

arodriguez1207 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I really need help!!! My baby boy is gonna be 1 year old in a week and he still sleeps with my husband and I. He breastfeeds so when I lay down to sleep I just feed and and we fall asleep. We tried the crib a few months ago but he just will not stop crying! I hate to hear him cry but I am soooo tired of sleeping in such a small crowded bed. Its a full and its three of us! Any tips and suggestions are very highly useful and appreciated!

rosy23 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

i would like some tips on getting 8 month old twins to sleep. i am worried about them waking each other up. it really doesn't happen yet thankfully. i haven't let them cry it out either...

This is gonna be great! |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I highly recommended The Sleep Sense Program... worked like a charm!

Sherrie1015 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I just decided to put her in her crib the other night, instead of in the pack n play next to our bed. I put on lullaby music (a volume just as loud as the TV would be) beacuse I know she falls alseep to music in the car to music without her binky. She slept the entire night since.... 8pm-7am.

kparadee |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

How to engage in sleep training with your baby? This is the topic being discussed here. There are tips offered in this article and they are good. I am sure any mother who cares for her baby to sleep well would love reading this article. I am sure using CPAP supplies can also help in getting a good sleep.

J3nnYCP4p |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My 7 month old goes to bed between 10:30 - 12 and wakes up around 4, then 7 and sleeps til 9. Then when she's teething she wakes up every 2 hours. Also, she sleeps with us. I want to get her to sleep by herself in her own crib thru the night. These are a lot of changes. Any suggestions on how to start this? Luckily I'm not working at the moment so I want to get her on a good schedule before I find a job (if I find a job...).

JerseyGirl1324 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

CIO is so unnatural. These are babies who can not verbally express themselves. They have to choice but to cry when they are in need. Babies are growing at a rapid pace, they are going to get hungry throughout the night, it's perfectly normal for them to expect a feeding, or a lot more in some cases. CIO damages them mentally & emotionally. Ignoring the child's cry is telling them that you don't care & that they can not depend on you. Parents, use your instincts & not what a nit-wit doctor thinks! If your child craves to be close to you then give them that closeness & let them sleep in your room or even in a co-sleeper bed, (or your bed but only if you breastfeed since breastfeedimg moms have a very strong maternal instinct that keeps them in-tune with baby so they can, even when asleep, sense what the baby needs). I learned the hard way with my first & went against my instincts & doing what the doctor said - letting my 6 month old CIO. Then I educated myself & started listening to my instincts & not what everyone was telling me. My son is very independent & at the age of 3 sleeps in his own bed & sleeping 12 hours every single night. He has learned that sleeping is pleasant & not to be dreaded.

Karabootie |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My daughter is about to be 1 in less than 2 weeks and still wakes up a couple of times a night. She goes to sleep so late and we really have never had a bedtime routine. I want her to go to bed at a resonable time so that if we ever am able to get away we would feel ok about her. How do we get her to go to bed earlier and easier?

Brandon's Queen |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

my little boy used to cry to go to bed, you used to put him in his cot with his mobile on and he would go to sleep, he was poorly over xmas and ever since he just screams if tyou try to put him in his cot before hes asleep, he wakes up every hour through the night also which is hard going , does anyone elses little one do this and has anyone got any tips i can try, thanks

laralambert |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I have a related question. My 11 mo baby slept great the first six months. Since Christmas, has been waking up two-three times a night! We did move and have lots of life changes in March, but since then things have been routine. We do a similar bedtime routine every night. She goes to sleep okay at bedtime. But wakes up every few hours. My husband and I are going insane!! Seems like she is waking up hungry some of the time. But she eats/drinks a lot during the day. Any advice? Neither husband nor I can tolerate the endless crying at night, so we're not getting very far with the "cry it out" method or the "husband only with bottle of water" as dr suggested. So miserable listening to her scream for mommy without stopping.

Ackittycat |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

with my little girl who is now almost a year, i would put her to sleep then lay her down and when she woke up i would pat her butt she would not get a bottle in the middle of the night when she reached 6 months, i would just get her back to sleep so she would not count on eating at 4 in the morning, if she woke up later around 7 i would feed her and we would play awhile. Now she goes to sleep on her own at night not during naps though,and sleeps from 9 or 10 to 8 or 9

mrswilliams10 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

WOW sleep training is very dangerous and I look forward to the day our society doesn't want our new babies and 6 month and 1 year old babies to be independent and grown. Just think about this little person down the hall in a crib alone. I am not saying I am against sleeping in cribs, but answering ALL their cries matters. Research was just done showing babies left to CIO under age 1 are more insecure and clingly and are not independent. Babies who are raised AP (attachment parenting) are more secure and independent because their needs are met. EVERY BABY IS DIFFERENT. My girls slept and nursed with me for 6 months then to crib and NEVER a peep for 12 hours. My son is now 11 months old and wakes every 3 to 4 hours so he just sleeps in bed with us. I could not let him cry, he has been in pain due to teething, needs more during growth spurts and is just needier. It is ok and it will pass. We really need to stop wanting them to just sleep through the night when they are so yound and helpless. Sorry to rant and I am not bashing anyone who does it, just please research against CIO and make sure you are not doing this all too young. I am an animal trainer and sleep training does 1 thing..teaches them I cry, noone comes so I will stop crying..so yes you extinguish the cry, but not healthy at all. Read Dr. SEars the baby book. Hugs to all.

julie0829 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

My baby is almost a year old and has YET to sleep through the night. I have tried everything from making sure he is uber full right before bed to letting him scream and trying to comfort him and walking out (which by the way does NOT work because he merely screams harder when I leave even if he was calm before). so I completely understand your frustration.

tlbv2010 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I tried the Sleep Easy Solution...it took 5 nights to put it into practice. On the 3rd night, she only woke up once. By the 5th night, she was sleeping through the night! The book is called the Sleep Easy Solution and I highly recommend it!

hypertuck1231 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

are you nursing or formula feeding? breastmilk (being more easily digestible) lends itself to a baby waking more at night but by 5-6 months you should be able to get about 5 hours straight. having never formula fed i can't speak to those sleep habits.

xtrememousey |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

my LO sleeps in the bed with us. I havent had the time to play with him. I havent solidified a schedule. I think i'll get him a musical toy, some after work activities between my arrival, cooking, eating, cleaning... getting my 11.5 month olds food ready for the next day... getting him to sleep in his crib peacefully and willingly is the key.

debronzeyes12 |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

I can't belive that Bump is using an author who states "vomiting is no big deal to babies and children. It's even fun for them" so it is OK to let them cry till they vomit as an expert on sleep training

Kissmekitty |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

"Baby Whisperer" is a great book on how to sleep train without the cruelty of crying it out.

Kissmekitty |

Q&A: How to sleep train?

Here is a great article: http://cobabies.com/magazine/rest-and-play-2012/hush-little-baby-getting-your-baby-to-sleep-through-the-night-may-not-be-the-ultimate-goal-after-all/

stacyh629 |